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Adnan Syed Of ‘Serial’ Has Been Released From Prison – What Does This Mean And How Did The Podcast Contribute To His Freedom?

Published September 20, 2022 at 10:41 AM PDT
Erica Suter, director of the Innocence Project Clinic at the University of Baltimore School of Law and Adnan Syed's attorney, speaks outside a courthouse in Baltimore, Maryland, September 19, 2022.
CHARLOTTE PLANTIVE/AFP via Getty Images
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AFP
Erica Suter, director of the Innocence Project Clinic at the University of Baltimore School of Law and Adnan Syed's attorney, speaks outside a courthouse in Baltimore, Maryland, September 19, 2022.

Adnan Syed Of ‘Serial’ Has Been Released From Prison – What Does This Mean And How Did The Podcast Contribute To His Freedom?

Serial Anan Syed Release 9.20.12

A Baltimore judge on Monday ordered the release of Adnan Syed after overturning Syed’s conviction for the 1999 murder of high school student Hae Min Lee — a case that was chronicled in the hit podcast “Serial,” a true-crime series that transfixed listeners and revolutionized the genre. Circuit Court Judge Melissa Phinn ordered that Syed’s conviction be vacated as she approved the release of the now-41-year-old who has spent more than two decades behind bars. There were gasps and applause in the crowded courtroom as the judge announced her decision.

Joining us today on AirTalk is podcast critic for Vulture and New York Magazine and founder of Hot Pod, Nick Quah and Northern California Innocence Project director Linda Starr to discuss the impact of the podcast Serial and what the overturning of Adnan Syed’s conviction means going forward.

Legendary Dodgers Player Maury Wills Dead At 89

Maury Wills Death 9.20.22

Today on AirTalk, Larry speaks with KPCC's own Nick Roman about the life and legacy of Dodgers legend Maury Wills.

COVID-19 AMA: Biden Says In Interview That Pandemic Is Over -- Is It?

Covid Update 9.20.22

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Kimberly Shriner, director of Infectious Disease and Prevention at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena.

Today’s topics include:

Slate’s Legal Correspondent Profiles Women Lawyers Who Stood Up To Trump Administration In New Book “Lady Justice”

Book Lady Justice 9.20.22

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health, there have been plenty of discussions about the decision’s implications for the future of women’s reproductive rights. But the decision doesn’t exist in a vacuum, as Slate senior editor and longtime legal correspondent Dahlia Lithwick discusses in her new book “Lady Justice: Women, the Law, and the Battle to Save America,” where she explores the six years preceding the Dobbs decision, the series of Trump administration policies that she says helped set the table for the Supreme Court to be in a position to reverse Roe v. Wade, and profiles some of the women lawyers who fought some of these policies in court -- and won. You’ll learn more about figures you know like Stacey Abrams, the voting rights activist and former Georgia state representative now running for governor of that state who was a key player in Democratic turnout in Georgia in the 2020 elections, and about figures you might not know about like the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund’s Nina Perales, who won a court battle to prevent a citizenship question from being added to the Census.

Today on AirTalk, Dahlia Lithwick stops in to talk about her new book.

EVs: Older Than You Think, And Back With A Fury

EV Past Future 9.20.22

The all electric city is no longer just a fantasy. It’s policy now, with California’s official ban on gas car sales by 2035 and the simultaneous requirement that all cars sold default to electric or hydrogen powered vehicles. These are just a couple of pieces in a future that, once put together, state and local lawmakers hope will help pave a path for complete electrification. But the attainable electric city is older than just a few decades, as KPCC climate emergency reporter Erin Stone explains in her most recent piece for LAist. In fact, she writes, EVs have a history that stretches as far back as the nineteenth century, when the very first electric vehicles evolved right alongside their gas powered cousins.

Today on AirTalk, Erin drops by to talk about her latest story and what she discovered about the past, present and future of electric vehicles, and we’ll also talk with Petersen Automotive Museum Chief Historian, Leslie Kendall.

A Name That’s Difficult To Pronounce May Impact Your Chances In The Job Market, According To New Research

Names In The Workplace 9.20.22

A new research paper suggests that people with names that are harder to pronounce are less likely to land an academic gig compared to their easy-to-pronounce named colleagues. About 10% less likely on average. Whether a name is difficult to pronounce is subjective of course, but the negative impacts are significant. So what should people with seemingly difficult to pronounce names do? Change their name? Some have but there may be other solutions, according to Stephen Wu, co-author of the new research and professor of economics at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. He joins Larry to discuss.

Cal-Mex Dining Is A Key Part Of The State’s History – What’s Your Go To Spot?

Cal-Mex With Gustavo 9.20.22

As Los Angeles Times Columnist Gustavo Arellano puts it in his recent piece, California Mexican dining, por vida. Cal-Mex is a style of food that has been in existence since the state’s existence. Even before. And while this type of dining, known for its loud decorations and gigantic proportions, has faced criticism for its inauthenticity compared to “real Mexican food,” it’s helped popularize Mexican food throughout the country and has thrived doing so. Even Arellano has come around to the fact that Cal-Mex is not only good, it holds much deeper meaning for generations. Arellano joins Larry to discuss.

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