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Power Grid Operator Issues Statewide Flex Alert. Here’s What You Should Know About The Call To Conserve Energy

Published August 17, 2022 at 9:51 AM PDT
An aerial image shows vehicles driving on the California 14 Highway as solar panels, part of an electricity generation plant, stand on June 18, 2021 in Kern County near Mojave, California.
PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images
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AFP
An aerial image shows vehicles driving on the California 14 Highway as solar panels, part of an electricity generation plant, stand on June 18, 2021 in Kern County near Mojave, California.

Power Grid Operator Issues Statewide Flex Alert. Here’s What You Should Know About The Call To Conserve Energy

Flex Alert 8.17.22

Forecasters warned Tuesday that a large swath of California’s interior will experience dangerously high temperatures and the state’s power grid operator called for voluntary energy conservation.

The heat spell will largely impact the Central Valley but will also extend out to interior portions of the north and east San Francisco Bay regions and to the coast south of Monterey Bay, the National Weather Service said.

The California Independent System Operator, which oversees the state’s electrical grid, issued a statewide Flex Alert — a call for voluntary electricity conservation — from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m on Wednesday due to predicted high temperatures pushing up energy demand and tightening available power supplies. Mark Rothleder, chief operating officer at the California Independent System Operator, and David Song, spokesperson for SoCal Edison, join Larry to discuss.

With files from the Associated Press

LAPD Chief Michel Moore On Gascon Recall, Back To School Safety And More

Chief Moore 8.17.22

Los Angeles Police Department Chief Michel Moore joins Larry Mantle on AirTalk today for his monthly visit to discuss the latest in LAPD and law enforcement news.

Today’s topics include:

  • Police Commission sets new rules for how LAPD uses surveillance technology
  • Hate crimes in Los Angeles this year could again set records, report finds
  • Effort to recall L.A. County District Attorney George Gascon fails to reach November ballot
  • Enforcement of L.A. City Council camping ban near schools -- who is responsible?
  • Recent protests at L.A. City Council meetings
  • How LAPD is viewing the 6th Street Bridge saga
  • Back to schoolsafety as LAUSD students return to classes
  • LAPD review of SWAT culture
  • Severalarrested after incidents of laser pointers being pointed at police helicopters

K-12 Is Often Make-Or-Break For Dyslexic Students

EDU Dyslexia 8.17.22

The California public education system’s approach to educating students with dyslexia is a study in contrasts. Some schools have made real strides in recent years to implement curricular and culture changes aimed at helping struggling readers and help dyslexic students overcome their early struggles before they fall too far behind. Yet in many schools, many parents feel like they must fight the system to get support for their struggling readers, paying thousands of dollars out-of-pocket for tutoring services or private evaluations. Advocates say that this is the result of Sacramento’s reluctance to hand down clear mandates around dyslexia means some other schools’ approaches to literacy instruction remain woefully out of date. Their case in point: California is one of only 10 states that does not require schools to assess all students for dyslexia.

Today on AirTalk, we’re joined by Kyle Stokes, senior reporter at LAist to discuss California’s response to educating students with dyslexia, the progress that’s being made, and all that’s left to accomplish.

With files from LAist 

What It’s Like To Revisit Your Childhood Home 25 Years After You Left It

Returning To Childhood Home 8.17.22

Many of us no doubt have memories, hopefully fond ones, of time spent growing up in our childhood homes -- playing outside with parents and siblings, family meals around the table, staying up late in your room talking to friends when you’re supposed to be doing homework…the list goes on. For Los Angeles Times staff writer Melody Gutierrez, the memories came flooding back when she visited her parents’ former home in Wonder Valley last year, 25 years after they’d moved away, to discover that the home is now abandoned. In a recent essay published in the Times, Gutierrez recounts her childhood memories of growing up in the 714 square foot home, what it meant to her and her siblings at the time, and the emotions she still associates with the building. There were even still some remnants of her family’s life there -- she found an old Barbie doll, for example, that she had left there when they moved out.

Today on AirTalk, we’re joined by L.A. Times Staff Writer Melody Gutierrez about what prompted her to drift from her usual state government and politics beat to write this essay about revisiting her childhood home.

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