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More Than 20 Years Have Passed Since The ‘War On Terror,’ How Has American Defense & Intelligence Changed?

National Security Council coordinator for strategic communications John Kirby waits to be introduced during the daily briefing at the White House on August 02, 2022 in Washington, DC. Kirby answered a range of questions related to the announcement on Monday of a U.S. strike that killed Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri.
Win McNamee/Getty Images
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Getty Images North America
National Security Council coordinator for strategic communications John Kirby waits to be introduced during the daily briefing at the White House on August 02, 2022 in Washington, DC. Kirby answered a range of questions related to the announcement on Monday of a U.S. strike that killed Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri.

More Than 20 Years Have Passed Since The ‘War On Terror,’ How Has American Defense & Intelligence Changed?

Modern Fight Against Terrorism 8.5.22

Al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahri was killed in Kabul by a U.S. drone on Monday. This serves as the most recent example of the United States ‘war on terror, which began after al-Zawahri and most notably Osama bin Laden plotted their 9/11 attack on the Twin Towers. With this ongoing battle, it leaves many folks wondering, what has the United States done in this time to improve its defense against terrorist attacks, not only by foreign enemies but also those domestically?

Today on AirTalk, we discuss the current state of anti-terrorism defense in the United States with Washington Post national security reporter Joby Warrick and William Braniff, director of National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START).

What Beyonce, Lizzo Changing Song Lyrics Says About The Evolution Of Artists’ Relationship With Their Fans

Artists Relationships To Fans 8.5.22

At what point does an artist decide to alter an original work based on audience feedback? It’s a question that has been in the spotlight recently with mega-recording artists Lizzo and Beyonce both changing lyrics to their songs after backlash over the use of the same ableist slur. It’s far from the first time an artist has altered song lyrics because of an offensive word or phrase, but do these two recent instances speak to an evolving relationship between not just musicians, but artists of all kinds and their fans? Do artists feel today that they have more of a responsibility to do right by their fans than they did in past years? Where do artists see the line between their work standing on its own as originally released while also making sure that they are being inclusive to their core fans? Should that even matter to an artist?

Today on AirTalk, we’ll ask Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic Mikael Wood and Loretta J. Ross, associate professor women and gender studies at Smith College, some of these questions and dig deeper into what artists like Lizzo and Beyonce changing lyrics from their original songs says about the evolution of creators’ relationship with their fans.

Millennials Are Mostly Staying Close To Where They Grew Up. Is That A Bad Thing?

Millenial Staying Close To Home 8.5.22

While young adults may have left the nest, they’re not flying far from home. According to a new paper, 90 percent of millennials, born between 1984 and 1992, live less than 500 miles from where they lived as a teenager. Nearly 60 percent live less than 10 miles and 30 percent still live in the exact same census tract. The general findings of low mobility aren’t necessarily new. But the research takes a deeper look at income, race and job-driven migration patterns. Ben Sprung-Keyser, one of the authors of the new paper titled “The Radius of Opportunity: Evidence from Migration and Local Labor Markets,” joins guest host Austin Cross to break down the findings. You can explore the visual data here.

FilmWeek: ‘Bullet Train,’ ‘Easter Sunday,’ ‘Luck,’ ‘Bodies Bodies Bodies’ And Many More

FilmWeek Reviews 8.5.22

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Christy Lemire, Peter Rainer, Tim Cogshell and Charles Solomon review this weekend’s new movie releases on streaming and on demand platforms.

John Horn’s Interview With Comedian Jo Koy Of Easter Sunday

FilmWeek Feature 8.5.22

Jo Koy is a Filipino American comedian and actor who has recently starred in two Netflix comedy specials. His latest project diverges from standup comedy and sees the actor play a version of himself in a version of his life. In the film “Easter Sunday,” Koy plays a character who is not only trying to balance work and parenting, but also dealing with Hollywood producers who want him to speak with a foreign accent that he doesn't have. KPCC’s John Horn sat down with Koy to talk about his new movie, and the importance of representation in cinema.

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