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UCLA Study Sheds Light On The Potential Origin Of The Coronavirus Responsible For COVID-19

People wearing face masks travel along a street in front of a closed of Huanan seafood market on January 23, 2022 in Wuhan, China.
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People wearing face masks travel along a street in front of a closed of Huanan seafood market on January 23, 2022 in Wuhan, China.

UCLA Study Sheds Light On The Potential Origin Of The Coronavirus Responsible For COVID-19

UCLA Study Covid Origins 7.27.22

A group of international researchers has been able to narrow the origins of the COVID-19 virus, with it likely coming from live animals sold at a wholesale market in Wuhan, China. The peer-reviewed studies, published in Science, found that early cases of the virus were found to be around Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market and spread was a result of animal-human interaction.

Today on AirTalk, we dig into the research and the rigorous process it took to get published with authors Joshua Levy, post-doctoral researcher at Scripps Research Institute and Jonathan Pekar, graduate student in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of California San Diego.

Migratory Monarchs Now Considered Endangered–How Did We Get Here And What’s Being Done To Conserve Them?

Monarch Endangered 7.27.22

The migratory monarch butterfly is now considered endangered according to International Union for Conservation of Nature, a non-profit focused on nature conservation. The subspecies of monarch butterflies have declined in its population, with a dwindling number of critters traveling from Canada and California, all the way down to Mexico to hibernate. Deforestation and pesticides are two major reasons for its decline according to the IUCN.

Today on AirTalk, we look into the importance of migratory monarchs getting this distinction of “endangered” and what can be done to conserve them. Guest host Sharon McNary is joined by co-chair of the IUCN butterfly and moth specialist group, Monika Bohm, and Scott Black, executive director of Xerces, a non-profit focused on invertebrate conservation.

Russia May Be Bluffing About Pulling Out Of The International Space Station. But Why?

Russia Leaving ISS 7.27.22

Russia will pull out of the International Space Station after 2024 and focus on building its own orbiting outpost, the country’s new space chief said Tuesday amid high tensions between Moscow and the West over the fighting in Ukraine.

The announcement, while not unexpected, throws into question the future of the 24-year-old space station, with experts saying it would be extremely difficult — perhaps a “nightmare,” by one reckoning — to keep it running without the Russians. NASA and its partners had hoped to continue operating it until 2030. But many wonder how legitimate the announcement is and whether Russia will actually follow through with it. Kenneth Chang, science reporter for the New York Times, and Cathleen Lewis, curator of International Space Programs and Spacesuits at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C., join guest host Sharon McNary to discuss the latest, plus the various global implications and beyond (literally.. space).

With files from the Associated Press 

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