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Looking Ahead To The Final January 6 Committee Hearing

Published July 21, 2022 at 9:47 AM PDT
Former Oath Keepers spokesperson Jason Van Tatenhove (R) and Stephen Ayres (L), who has pleaded guilty to entering the Capitol illegally on January 6, are sworn in before a full committee hearing on "the January 6th Investigation," on Capitol Hill on July 12, 2022, in Washington, DC.
DEMETRIUS FREEMAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
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AFP
Former Oath Keepers spokesperson Jason Van Tatenhove (R) and Stephen Ayres (L), who has pleaded guilty to entering the Capitol illegally on January 6, are sworn in before a full committee hearing on "the January 6th Investigation," on Capitol Hill on July 12, 2022, in Washington, DC.

Looking Ahead To The Final January 6 Committee Hearing

J6 Hearing Preview 7.21.22

The January 6 Committee has its last confirmed hearing on primetime television today, with its focus being on former President Donald Trump’s inability to prevent the insurrection’s violent outcome. This follows the previous hearing, which focused on extremist groups government officials who instigated the attack on the US Capitol.

Today on the program, we review the last seven hearings and previews today’s with Washington Post senior reporter Aaron Blake and Sarah Sadhwani, politics professor at Pomona College and commissioner on the 2020 Citizens Redistricting Commission.

A New Study Shows The Richer You Get, The Less You Care About Others

UCI Wealth Study 7.21.22

A new study reveals that people who become affluent, versus those who are born into wealth, are less likely to have sympathy for the poor. The first part of the study, published in the journal of Social Psychological and Personality Science, asked 600 randomly selected Americans’ attitudes towards two groups: those who inherited their wealth and those who became rich. Which group, the study’s authors asked, would feel more empathy towards the poor? And which group would be more likely to attribute poverty to external circumstances? The study found that participants favored those who “became rich” as being more generous and sympathetic towards the poor. But a second study found that that’s not necessarily the case. In the second part of the study, researchers look at top earners in both camps. The conclusion they came to is that those who “became rich” were less sympathetic towards the poor because they believed in upward mobility, and those who were “born rich” were more likely to sympathize with those living in poverty.

Today on AirTalk, we’re joined by professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia, Azim Shariff, to discuss the surprising findings from the study he co-authored about wealth and why this study matters.

Diversity In Major Cities Is Improving – What About Actual Integration Though?

RACIAL INTEGRATION DATA ANALYSIS 7.21.22

Over the last few decades, our population has grown much more diverse thanks to migration and immigration. Yes, our cities are becoming more diverse, but that doesn’t mean we’re making big strides when it comes to racial integration. According to a new Wall Street Journal report, segregation has been steadily improving across all racial groups since 1970, but it’s slow, and some regions are in better shape than others. For example, parts of the south and west are less segregated than parts of the northeast and midwest. Research from UC Berkeley's Othering and Belonging Institute found even less improvement than the WSJ found in its analysis. It found that out of every metropolitan region with more than 200,000 residents, 81% were more segregated in 2019 compared to 1990. Research also shows people living in segregated communities are more likely to experience worse key outcomes like life expectancy and home value. Paul Overberg, reporter for the Wall Street Journal, and Samir Gambhir, director of the Equity Metrics Program at the Othering and Belonging Institute at UC Berkeley, where he researches various equity issues including racial residential segregation, join AirTalk to discuss. If you have thoughts or questions, call 866-893-5722 or email atcomments@kpcc.org.

COVID-19 AMA: CDC Approves Novavax Vaccine, Which Uses Traditional Technology.

COVID Update 7.21.22

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Shruti Gohil, professor of medicine and associate medical director for epidemiology and infection prevention at UC Irvine’s School of Medicine

Topics today include:

  • Many in L.A. shrug off COVID wave despite super-infectious new sub-variants
  • CDC panelapproves Novavax vaccine, which employs traditional vaccine tech
  • Amid new COVID surge,confusing mix of rules
  • You just tested yourself for COVID-19. Should youreport the results to L.A. County?
  • California COVID hospitalizations have quadrupled. Who isgetting really sick?
  • CDC cruise ship COVID tracking programends
  • USC researchersidentify symptoms associated with increased risk for long COVID

Summer Camp Is A Staple Of American Culture – We Want To Hear Your Favorite Memories

SUMMER CAMP OPEN PHONES 7.21.22

According to theAmerican Camp Association, over 15,000 overnight and day camps welcome upwards of 20 million kids every summer. On top of that, the industry employs nearly 2 million Americans every summer, from counselors to all kinds of camp staff. Summer camp feels like a unique American custom and there are many enduring appeals for both parents, kids, and the counselors who return every year. What exactly is that allure? It may be different depending on who you ask. For kids, it’s an opportunity to explore the outdoors, play group games and hang out with your friends. For parents, maybe it’s the satisfaction of knowing their child is outside, socializing and creating memories with friends new and old. Or, you know, maybe they’re just happy to have a little peace and quiet. And for counselors, there are a number of different draws, none of which are the unremarkable paycheck. Whether you attended summer camp as a camper or counselor, our experiences at summer camp can be some of the most formative of our early lives.

Today on AirTalk, we want to hear from you. If you attended summer camp as a camper or counselor, we want to know how you chose which summer camp to attend and a lasting memory you have. Join the conversation by calling us at 866-893-5722 or by emailing at comments@kpcc.org.

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