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Project Roomkey Is Ending – What Happens To The Thousands Of Unhoused People The Program Sheltered?

Published July 19, 2022 at 10:00 AM PDT
Tents house the homeless on the streets of Los Angeles, California on February 24, 2022, as volunteers participate on the third night of the Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count on February 24, 2022 in Los Angeles, California.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
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AFP
Tents house the homeless on the streets of Los Angeles, California on February 24, 2022, as volunteers participate on the third night of the Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count on February 24, 2022 in Los Angeles, California.

Project Roomkey Is Ending – What Happens To The Thousands Of Unhoused People The Program Sheltered?

Project Roomkey Ending 7.19.22

Project Roomkey launched in April 2020, soon after the pandemic began. The plan was to set up temporary shelter for up to 10,000 unhoused people in hotels and motels across the city. The long-term goal was a path towards permanent housing. Now, the project is beginning to phase out. Among the 37 properties that were part of Project Roomkey, only five are left including and only a few Roomkey hotels will provide shelter through September. Those who received housing at part of Project Roomkey are left wondering what’s next for them. On July 1st, The Mayfair Hotel in Downtown Los Angeles housed 215 people. Now, there are only two. The Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority, the organization behind Project Roomkey, was supposed to give people 90 days notice before their lease was up. Some residents say that’s happening, while others disagree.

Today on AirTalk, we’re joined by anchor reporter at Spectrum News, Kate Cagle and executive director of the Los Angeles Community Action Network, Pete White to discuss the ending of Project Roomkey and what happens next for the thousands of people still in need of permanent housing when this program ends.

Hospital Workers Say LA’s New Minimum Wage Will Address Severe Staffing Shortages. So Why Do Some Healthcare Systems Want It Repealed?

AT Healthcare Min Wage 7.19.22

The city of Los Angeles recently enacted an ordinance to raise the minimum wage for hospital and healthcare workers. While workers praise the new $25 an hour minimum as a tangible solution to severe staffing shortages and retention problems, others say the move will have negative consequences on healthcare systems and medical care. The No on the Unequal Pay Measure campaign, which is sponsored by the California Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, is gathering signatures in an attempt to bring the question to voters. If the campaign gathers enough signatures in time, it can block the wageincrease from going into effect until at least after a vote. Gabe Montoya, an emergency room technician from Kaiser Downey who was part of the campaign to increase the minimum wage, and Becky Warren, spokesperson for the No on the Unequal Pay Campaign, join AirTalk to discuss the implications.

How The Pandemic Changed When And Why People Retire

Postponing Retirement 7.19.22

We’ve heard a lot about the so-called “Great Resignation” throughout the pandemic -- stories galore of people who quit their 9-to-5 office jobs in the pursuit of happiness, professional fulfillment or maybe just more time with their families, because life is short and the coronavirus pandemic has been an all-too-real reminder of that fact. But at the same time, we’ve also seen signs of a sort of “Great Retirement” as many workers who might have been still a few years away from retiring have decided to call it quits early. Others nearing retirement have decided to put it off for a little longer so they can make a little more money. And still others have “unretired” after initially retiring, maybe because they couldn’t or didn’t want to live on their retirement savings alone, or maybe because they just got bored.

Today on AirTalk, fee-only certified financial planner and investment advisor Delia Fernandez is back with us to share what she’s seeing among her clients and get some tips on how to best navigate your plans to retire early or re-enter the workforce and how to make the most of your government benefits and retirement funds.

AirTalk Primer: Breaking Down Two California Gambling Propositions On November’s Ballot

Sports Betting And Tribal Gaming 7.19.22

California’s ballot measures are official, with there only seven to look out for this November two of which are sports gambling-centric. Propositions 26 and 27 would be efforts two legalize sports gambling in the State of California but via two methods. Proposition 26 would legalize sports gambling only for in-person attendees of tribal casinos while Proposition 27 would allow major betting sites like Fanduel and Draftkings into the state as long as they partner with a tribe in the state.

Today on AirTalk, we explain these gambling propositions with Casino.org senior reporter Steve Bittenbender and Steve Light, professor at the University of North Dakota and co-director for its Institute for the Study of Tribal Gaming Law & Policy.

Multilingual Listeners On Blending Languages And How They Choose Their Words

Switching Langs Open Phones 7.19.22

Quick transitions from one language to another are nothing new for people who are multilingual. Think Spanglish. It happens within a blink of an eye and with seemingly little thought behind the conversion. But today on AirTalk, we want to talk more about the seamless blending of languages and how and why multilingual listeners decide which words to use in one language versus the other. Is there thought behind it? Does it simply develop over time? We hear from listeners on their experiences.

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