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With USC And UCLA Leaving The Pac-12 For Big Ten, How Will College Athletics Be Affected?

TJ Guy #42 of the Michigan Wolverines celebrates winning the Big Ten Football Championship game against the Iowa Hawkeyes at Lucas Oil Stadium on December 04, 2021 in Indianapolis, Indiana.
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Getty Images North America
TJ Guy #42 of the Michigan Wolverines celebrates winning the Big Ten Football Championship game against the Iowa Hawkeyes at Lucas Oil Stadium on December 04, 2021 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

With USC And UCLA Leaving The Pac-12 For Big Ten, How Will College Athletics Be Affected?

USC And UCLA Big Ten 7.1.22

In a surprising and seismic shift in college athletics, the Big Ten voted Thursday to add USC and UCLA as conference members beginning in 2024. The expansion to 16 teams will happen after the Pac-12’s current media rights contracts with Fox and ESPN expire and make the Big Ten the first conference to stretch from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The announcement came almost a year after Oklahoma and Texas formally accepted invitations to join the Southeastern Conference in July 2025. Big Ten Commissioner Kevin Warren said USC and UCLA, both members of the Pac-12 and its previous iterations for nearly a century, submitted applications for membership. The league’s Council of Presidents and Chancellors voted unanimously to add the Los Angeles schools. USC athletic director Mike Bohn said, “Ultimately, the Big Ten is the best home for USC and Trojan athletics as we move into the new world of collegiate sports.” Today on AirTalk, we look at what this shift means for college athletics, financial viability for college programs, and more with Ryan Kartje, USC beat writer for the Los Angeles Times.

With files from Associated Press 

Fossil Fuel Lifeline In State Budget Flames A Debate On California Energy Dependence

CA Energy Debate 7.1.22

It’s been a whirlwind week for energy groups in the state of California. This week, state lawmakers approved and Governor Newsom signed an expansive energy bill that split players in the state over how to address California’s energy future.

The law gives the California Department of Water Resources and the California Energy Commission greatly expanded authority to site energy plants. The powers led to criticism from local energy agencies, who worry about losing their local control in the process. And while the legislation is an attempt to make it easier to approve renewable energy sources in the long-term, it’s also expected to prolong the use of fossil fuels in the state in the short-term, so the DWR and CEC can amass energy reserves, in hopes of avoiding black and brown outs this summer. The law could extend the use of some natural-gas power plants, as well as California’s last nuclear power plant, Diablo Canyon.

Today on AirTalk, we discuss this new process of energy procurement, development and strategic reliance with Julie Cart, environmental reporter at the nonprofit news site CalMatters, Siva Gunda, Vice Chair of the California Energy Commission, and Alexis Sutterman, Energy Equity Program Manager for the California Environmental Justice Alliance.

Checking In With The Airline Industry As They Prep For July 4th Weekend

Summer Travel And Flights 7.1.22

Lots going on in the airline industry this week and the holiday rush isn’t the only news headline, with Delta pilots picketing for pay increases schedule changes across the nation, including LAX. With Delta experiencing facing a labor dispute during a busy time of year, how is the industry as a whole managing?

Today on AirTalk, we break down this and other major headlines with CNBC airline reporter Leslie Josephs, as well as hear how airports are managing the upcoming holiday traveling with Heath Montgomery, director of public relations for LAX.

FilmWeek: ‘Minions: The Rise of Gru,’ ‘The Forgiven,’ ‘Accepted’ And Many More

FilmWeek Reviews 7.1.22

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Tim Cogshell, Lael Loewenstein and Charles Solomon review this weekend’s new movie releases on streaming and on demand platforms.

John Horn’s Interview Director Baz Luhrmann About His New Film ‘Elvis’

John Horn Interview 7.1.22

To many, Baz Luhrmann isn’t just a noted Australian director — he’s an auteur filmmaker. Luhrmann exhibits a certain artistic control over his craft to produce a distinct style that makes his films become more than the sum of their parts. Just think of ‘Romeo and Juliet,’ or ‘Moulin Rouge’ or ‘The Great Gatsby.’ From set design, to soundtrack, to costumes Luhrmann puts his eccentric touch on every detail.

Today on FilmWeek, KPCC’s John Horn speaks with Baz Luhrmann about directing ‘Elvis,’ and the unique challenges he faced when recreating famous footage while staying true to his taste. You can hear what our critics Christy Lemire and Andy Klein thought of ‘Elvis’ on last week’s FilmWeek episode, available here or wherever you get your podcasts. Elvis is in wide release.

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