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DOC AMA: COVID-19 Cases Continue To Surge In LA County, National Cases Double Over 3 Weeks And More

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
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AFP
The Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine is prepared for administion at a mobile clinic in an East Los Angeles neighborhood which has shown lower vaccination rates especially among the young on July 9, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.

DOC AMA: COVID-19 Cases Continue To Surge In LA County, National Cases Double Over 3 Weeks And More

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Sam Torbati of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

Topics today include:

  • COVID cases surge in LA County
  • US COVID-19 cases double over three weeks
  • Delta variant now accounts for 58% of COVID-19 cases in U.S., CDC says
  • U.S. hospitals in COVID hot spots seeing exponential growth of patients
  • Study says 25% of young adults are unlikely to get the vaccine
  • Tougher tactics convincing unvaccinated to get the shot are needed, experts say
  • Are COVID symptoms different with the Delta variant?

GUEST:

Sam Torbati, M.D., co-chair of the department of emergency medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Jazz Saxophonist & Band Leader Kamasi Washington On His Return To The Hollywood Bowl

Saxophone virtuoso and Los Angeles native Kamasi Washington returns to the Hollywood Bowl this summer as the Bowl returns to a more regular schedule following the COVID-19 shutdown. The Emmy and Grammy-nominated Washington, a Los Angeles native who attended Hamilton High in Beverlywood and UCLA, has released two solo albums and worked with Compton rapper Kendrick Lamar on his Grammy-winning 2015 album "To Pimp A Butterfly." He’ll be on stage at the Bowl on July 18th with Earl Sweatshirt.

For more information and to purchase tickets, click here.

GUEST:

Kamasi Washington, Grammy-nominated musician and composer

Preliminary Data Finds That United States Drug-Overdose Deaths Increased By Nearly 30% In 2020

Preliminary federal data has found that drug-overdose deaths in the U.S. increased by nearly 30% last year, the result of the destabilization of the COVID-19 pandemic and a more deadly supply.

Experts estimate that 93,331 people died of overdoses last year, a record high and the sharpest annual increase in thirty years. In 2019, an estimated 72,151 people died of overdoses. The surge was largely driven by the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl, which has proliferated around the country.

GUEST:

Marvin D. Seppala, chief medical officer of the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation and a national expert on addiction treatment and the integration of evidence-based practices; he tweets @MarvSeppalaMD

What's Driving Up The Cost Of Cars?

A shortage of cars during the COVID-19 pandemic has led to soaring prices for both new and used cars. An initial decrease in demand for new vehicles when the pandemic began meant that automakers started producing fewer cars. And when production finally resumed, it was hampered by a global shortage of microchips. With fewer new cars available, the price of used cars has increased to record levels. And now, the shortages and the surge in prices are bringing down car sales to pre-pandemic levels.

Today on AirTalk, we'll explore what's driving the increased costs of new and used cars, how that could affect interest in public transit, and what it means for the economy.

GUESTS:

Jessica Caldwell, auto industry analyst with Edmunds, a Santa Monica-based company that guides car shoppers online from research to purchase; she tweets @jessrcaldwell

Charlie Chesbrough, senior economist at Cox Automotive, an Atlanta-based company that conducts research on auto industry trends and acts as a resource for dealers and consumers

The Evolution Of Teen Girls’ Influence And Power Throughout Music And Pop Culture

Teen girls are often the most influential when it comes to cultural trends and pop culture. They’re also often disparaged and belittled all at the same time. Odd juxtaposition, right?

This treatment of teen girls is nothing new, but Vox Senior Reporter Constance Grady wonders whether teen girls of today hold more power within their position. Today on AirTalk, Larry talks with Grady about her recent piece “Is the teen girl the most powerful force in pop culture?” along with Ilana Nash, an associate professor and chair of Gender and Women’s Studies at Western Michigan University. She’s also the author of “American Sweethearts: Teenage Girls in Twentieth-Century Popular Culture.”

GUESTS:

Constance Grady, senior reporter at Vox, her piece is “Is the teen girl the most powerful force in pop culture?” she tweets @constancegrady

Ilana Nash, associate professor and chair of Gender and Women’s Studies at Western Michigan University, she’s the author of “American Sweethearts: Teenage Girls in Twentieth-Century Popular Culture” (Indiana UP, 2006)

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