Member-supported news for Southern California
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Support for KPCC comes from:

NRA pushes for expanded 2nd Amendment rights

Rifles on a stand at an NRA exhibition in Louisville, KY.
ILMO JOE/Flickr (cc by-nc-nd)
Rifles on a stand at an NRA exhibition in Louisville, KY.

Three years ago, the Supreme Court angered gun control advocates when it overturned Washington, D.C.’s ban on handguns. Their ruling in District of Columbia v. Heller established that the 2nd Amendment provides an “individual right” to possess guns in the home for self-defense; two years later, a similar case in Chicago led them to extend the ruling nationwide. Since then, over 400 legal challenges have been filed, as gun owners and across America seek the right to carry concealed firearms in public as well; nearly all have been rejected by courts at the state level. Here in California, Peruta v. County of San Diego unsuccessfully sought to allow gun owners to obtain “concealed carry,” or CCW, permits in the name of self-protection; that case is currently under appeal. Now, the National Rifle Association is asking the Supreme Court to hear two cases that would fire up the debate once again. In Maryland, one man is challenging his conviction for having a legally acquired gun in a bag in his car as he was driving home from his girlfriend’s house. And a Virginia man is appealing his one-year sentence for having a loaded weapon in his car while he slept in a national park; since he frequently travels for work and has to sleep in his car, he claims he needs the gun for safety. The NRA is asking the Supreme Court to take up the issue in order to correct what they say is a “widespread misapprehension that the 2nd Amendment’s scope does not extend beyond the home.” Does the “right to keep and bear arms” apply only at home? Should law-abiding, upstanding citizens with permitted weapons be allowed to take them to work, to the store, on road trips? Who should be allowed CCW permits, and under what conditions? Are our courts protecting us or endangering us by restricting legal handgun use?

Three years ago, the Supreme Court angered gun control advocates when it overturned Washington, D.C.’s ban on handguns. Their ruling in District of Columbia v. Heller established that the 2nd Amendment provides an “individual right” to possess guns in the home for self-defense; two years later, a similar case in Chicago led them to extend the ruling nationwide. Since then, over 400 legal challenges have been filed, as gun owners and across America seek the right to carry concealed firearms in public as well; nearly all have been rejected by courts at the state level. Here in California, Peruta v. County of San Diego unsuccessfully sought to allow gun owners to obtain “concealed carry,” or CCW, permits in the name of self-protection; that case is currently under appeal. Now, the National Rifle Association is asking the Supreme Court to hear two cases that would fire up the debate once again. In Maryland, one man is challenging his conviction for having a legally acquired gun in a bag in his car as he was driving home from his girlfriend’s house. And a Virginia man is appealing his one-year sentence for having a loaded weapon in his car while he slept in a national park; since he frequently travels for work and has to sleep in his car, he claims he needs the gun for safety. The NRA is asking the Supreme Court to take up the issue in order to correct what they say is a “widespread misapprehension that the 2nd Amendment’s scope does not extend beyond the home.” Does the “right to keep and bear arms” apply only at home? Should law-abiding, upstanding citizens with permitted weapons be allowed to take them to work, to the store, on road trips? Who should be allowed CCW permits, and under what conditions? Are our courts protecting us or endangering us by restricting legal handgun use?

Guests:

Daniel Vice, Senior Attorney at the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence and co-author of their recent report, Hollow Victory

Alan Gottlieb, Founder of the Second Amendment Foundation

Stay Connected