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New parking plan positive for small businesses…but what about residents?

A Los Angeles parking meter.
tschundler/Flickr (cc by-nc-nd)
A Los Angeles parking meter.

Currently business owners in Los Angeles are required to own a certain number of parking spaces based on the size and type of business they run. But a new city ordinance would change all that. Under the new plan the city would create parking districts then determine the amount of parking needed for the entire district. It would mean a lot more flexibility for business owners as they would no longer have to buy or build new parking spaces. LA City rolled out a pilot parking project in Eagle Rock four years ago which allowed businesses to pay into a city-run parking fund to maintain street parking and meters. The goal of this program was to increase development by saving small business owners money. The LA City Council will vote on the ordinance this summer but the debate is already heating up. Residents in one proposed parking district in West L.A have filed suit against the city saying the spill-over from the businesses reduces parking available for neighborhood residents. So it’s a question of developers versus homeowners. Should the city of Los Angeles give businesses a break? And if so…at what cost?

Currently business owners in Los Angeles are required to own a certain number of parking spaces based on the size and type of business they run. But a new city ordinance would change all that. Under the new plan the city would create parking districts then determine the amount of parking needed for the entire district. It would mean a lot more flexibility for business owners as they would no longer have to buy or build new parking spaces. LA City rolled out a pilot parking project in Eagle Rock four years ago which allowed businesses to pay into a city-run parking fund to maintain street parking and meters. The goal of this program was to increase development by saving small business owners money. The LA City Council will vote on the ordinance this summer but the debate is already heating up. Residents in one proposed parking district in West L.A have filed suit against the city saying the spill-over from the businesses reduces parking available for neighborhood residents. So it’s a question of developers versus homeowners. Should the city of Los Angeles give businesses a break? And if so…at what cost?

Guests:

Mott Smith, Principal, Civic Enterprise Associates, a strategic planning and development company in the city of Los Angeles

Cary Brazeman, Founder of L.A. Neighbors United, a community group

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