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Census 2020 SCOTUS Decision, Koreatown Homeless, A Few Tips on Coyotes

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The printing company R.R. Donnelley & Sons has been selected to print the 2020 census paper questionnaires. The company previously printed forms and envelopes for the 2010 census.
Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images
The printing company R.R. Donnelley & Sons has been selected to print the 2020 census paper questionnaires. The company previously printed forms and envelopes for the 2010 census.

Census 2020 SCOTUS Decision

This morning, the Supreme Court blocked a question from the 2020 census that asks, "Is this person a citizen of the United States." The decision comes more than a year after Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding it to census form. But the explanation given for WHY the question should be added led, in part,  to the court's decision today. In writing the majority opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts essentially argued it wasn't good enough. Here is part of that text: "If judicial review is to be more than an empty ritual, it must demand something better than the explanation offered for the action taken in this case." The ruling does leave room for the question to be reconsidered maybe should the government come back with a better justification for adding the question. And today, President Trump tweeted that he's asking his lawyers if they can delay the census even though taking a census is mandated by the Constitution.

Guest:

  • Thomas Saenz, president and legal counsel for MALDEF, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund

Koreatown Homeless Part One

Homelessness is getting worse in Koreatown, up 79 percent over last year, homeless count data shows. City officials had planned to build a shelter there — part of a campaign to put more beds across the city, not just Skid Row. But backlash to the idea was instant. All this week, we look at what’s happened in the year since. First, the political fallout. KPCC’s Josie Huang reports from Koreatown.

Koreatown Homeless Part Two

Homelessness is getting worse in Koreatown, up 79 percent over last year, homeless count data shows. City officials had planned to build a shelter there — part of a campaign to put more beds across the city, not just Skid Row. But backlash to the idea was instant. All this week, we look at what’s happened in the year since. Now we hear from the protesters who protested those who fought against the homeless shelter. KPCC’s Josie Huang reports from Koreatown.

Veterans and Video Games

When you think about all the challenges veterans face after they're injured in the service, struggling to play video games may not be the first to come to mind. But some VA medical centers have realized helping vets get back in the game can also help with their recovery. Stephanie Colombini of the American Homefront Project reports from Tampa.

Emmy Tsunami

The second of two Democratic presidential debates takes place Thursday night. There are 24 — TWENTY FOUR—declared candidates so far. But if you thought that ballot was looking crowded try being an Emmy voter right now! There's too much good TV out there to keep up with, even if your job is to produce it. So that's created a shift in how people vote for and campaign for an Emmy nod. 

Guest:

  • Alex Ben Block. He reports on Hollywood, and his latest piece for Los Angeles Magazine is titled, "The Emmys Are Being Swamped by a Tsunami of Content."

Coyotes, A Few Tips

As summer comes into full swing, the coyote pups born this past, very rainy Spring are now grown and prowling the streets of Los Angeles. One tip: do NOT run for the hills: that’s where they live. We’ll share more on how to properly handle a coyote interaction.

Guest:

  • Justin Brown, an ecologist with the Santa Monica Mountains recreation area

This is Not A T-Shirt 

Think fashion in Los Angeles, and destinations like Rodeo Drive or Melrose Place come to mind. But another area has become ICONIC for original California style. Fairfax Avenue is home to some of the biggest names in L.A. streetwear, and we speak with one of its founding fathers. Bobby Kim — also known as Bobby Hundreds — helped put L.A. streetwear on the map with his brand, The Hundreds. His new book 'This is Not a T-Shirt' is part memoir, part anthology, part advice manual. 

Guest:

  • Bobby Kim, Author of "This is Not A T-Shirt"

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