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From battlefield to culinary field: MREs continue to inspire long after combat

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"Meals Ready to Eat" aims to bring together the civilian and military communities by using gourmet food inspired by veterans.

When you think military food, "gourmet" probably isn't the first word that comes to mind. But there's a new show on KCET looking to change that:

https://player.vimeo.com/video/180974309

"Meals Ready to Eat" is made by —  and for  — military veterans, but it seeks to build a bridge to the civilian community using that thing that brings us all together: food. The show visits different military food operations around the world, speaking with chefs there about the military's current culinary status and cooking up meals along the way.

August Dannehl co-writes and hosts "Meals Ready to Eat."  He's also a Navy veteran.

Dannehl spoke with A Martinez about the project and why it's important to find and tell the stories that often go untold.

Food and the military community

Food usually works as the great equalizer. As a thing that brings people together.

August Dannehl, host of the show "Meals Ready to Eat" speaks to A Martinez about the show.
Lori Galarreta/KPCC
August Dannehl, host of the show "Meals Ready to Eat" speaks to A Martinez about the show.

By veterans, for veterans

"Meals Ready to Eat" is produced in partnership with the group We are the Mighty, a multi-platform media brand that produces events and content by,  and for, veterans.

That might be because most people think military food is, well, not very good. 
Close up of the creamy spinach fettuccine A Martinez ate.
Lori Galarreta/KPCC
Close up of the creamy spinach fettuccine A Martinez ate.

A Martinez's first MRE

In case you didn't catch it, the show's title is a nod to "Meals Ready to Eat," or MREs — those instant food packs given out to the military in the field. These dishes are often dropped from thousands of feet high into combat zones and will usually have enough calories to satiate a soldier for a whole day.

To illustrate just how much of a staple MREs are in the military community, Dannehl brought one for A Martinez to try.

Contents of the creamy spinach fettuccine MRE that A Martinez tried.
Lori Galarreta/KPCC
Contents of the creamy spinach fettuccine MRE that A Martinez tried.

The meal was creamy spinach fettuccine. The MRE packet also came with crackers, peanut butter, a chocolate protein drink and pretzel sticks. See the verdict from the taste test below:

Although the meal was deemed "passable," Dannehl recommended A Martinez not to finish it. The reason? MREs are almost completely stripped of fiber content so the military personnel eating these meals won't have the need to use the bathroom too often — a definite inconvenience during combat. 

"Meals Ready to Eat" premieres Tuesday, November 8 at 8:30 pm on KCET.

To hear more about the program and how it aims to bring communities together, click the blue play button above.

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