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The GOP calls it the "Succeed Act," but it's basically DACA 2.0.

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WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 25:  U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) (2nd L) speaks as Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) (L) and Sen. Thom Tillis (R-ND) (R) listen during a news conference to announce the "SUCCEED Act" September 25, 2017 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. Sens Tillis and Lankford introduced a bill to address the undocumented status of immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally when they were children.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images
U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) (2nd L) speaks as Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) (L) and Sen. Thom Tillis (R-ND) (R) listen during a news conference to announce the "SUCCEED Act" at the Capitol in Washington, DC.

Yesterday, three GOP senators announced the SUCCEED ACT, a conservative take on immigration reform. It looks pretty similar to DACA-- except for some key changes.

There's a new immigration bill in the Senate, and we can probably just call it "DACA 2.0."

Yesterday, Republican Sens. Thom Tillis, James Lankford, and Orrin Hatch introduced the SUCCEED Act, which they hope can replace the program that protects young people brought to this country illegally by their parents. 

"It, in theory, should cover people who are already enrolled in the DACA program. And then some," said Politico reporter Seung Min Kim in an interview with KPCC's Josie Huang. 

In her reporting, Kim found that there's bipartisan support for immigration reform -- and DACA recipients are among the most sympathetic of immigrants who entered the US illegally. So while there are conservatives who want to see these people become citizens, they want that path to be conservative in principle. 

"They really want to prioritize fairness," Kim said. "And, you know, Republican senators strive to do that by actually creating a pathway to citizenship that is long, that is arduous, but that is definitely possible."

To hear the full interview and learn more about the SUCCEED Act and its departures from the DACA program, use the blue media player above. 

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