Member-supported news for Southern California
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Support for KPCC comes from:

Colombia's FARC deal could leave many war criminals unpunished

Ways to Subscribe
Opponents of peace agreements between rebels of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, FARC, with the government gather outside the congress in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. Colombia's congress is debating a modified peace accord between the government and FARC rebels, with an eye toward ratifying a deal that was rejected by voters in a referendum less than two months ago. (AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)
Ivan Valencia/AP
Opponents of peace agreements between rebels of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, FARC, with the government gather outside the congress in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. Colombia's congress is debating a modified peace accord between the government and FARC rebels, with an eye toward ratifying a deal that was rejected by voters in a referendum less than two months ago. (AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)

The new peace accord could give immunity to thousands of guerilla fighters. According to one expert, that could lead some civilians to turn vigilante.

Colombia's Congress has approved a revised peace deal with the rebel group known as FARC. Members of the militants will have 150 days to disarm. 

It's an accord that the country's president, Juan Manuel Santos, hopes will close the chapter on a conflict that has spanned over five decades and has left more that 200,000 people dead. 

For more on what this new deal could mean, Take Two spoke to Cynthia Arnson, director of the Latin American Program at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC. 

Press the blue play button above to hear the full interview. 

Stay Connected