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Drought pits agriculture's livelihood against the environment

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 Dried and cracked earth is visible on an unplanted field at a farm on April 29, 2014 near Mendota, California. As the California drought continues, Central California farmers are hiring well drillers to seek water underground for their crops after the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation stopped providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Dried and cracked earth is visible on an unplanted field at a farm on April 29, 2014 near Mendota, California. As the California drought continues, Central California farmers are hiring well drillers to seek water underground for their crops after the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation stopped providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff.

Five years into the California drought, Take Two looks at the struggle between saving the agricultural industry and protecting wildlife and water resources.

In the fifth year of California's drought, farmers in the San Joaquin Valley are fighting to stay in business. A record breaking number of wells have been drilled as farmers try to access much needed groundwater.

While the economy of California's Central Valley depends on the area's farming industry, there are concerns that the unregulated spike in ground drilling and water pumping has serious implications for wildlife and community access to water. 

Sacramento Bee reporter, Ryan Sabalow joined Take Two to  discuss the nexus between livelihood and environmental protection.  

To hear the interview, click the Blue Arrow above. 

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