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The role of video in police investigations, deciphering shooting data, looking ahead to the first presidential debate

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CHARLOTTE, NC - SEPTEMBER 21: Police officers face off with protesters on the I-85 (Interstate 85)during protests in the early hours of September 21, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The protests began last night, following the fatal shooting of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott by a police officer at an apartment complex near UNC Charlotte. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Sean Rayford/Getty Images
CHARLOTTE, NC - SEPTEMBER 21: Police officers face off with protesters on the I-85 (Interstate 85)during protests in the early hours of September 21, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The protests began last night, following the fatal shooting of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott by a police officer at an apartment complex near UNC Charlotte. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

How police agencies decide if and when to release video of shootings, unpacking the data of police use of force, SoCal-centered analysis of the upcoming presidential debate.

Facing mounting pressure from protestors and community leaders, Charlotte police chief Kerr Putney made the decision over the weekend to release dashboard and body cam videos of the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina.
For decades, there hasn't been consistent and comprehensive tracking of officer-involved shootings in the US. But that's starting to change.
The two have long struggled with high negative marks. Tonight, their biggest challenge might be playing down the attributes voters find odious.
While the most recent polls see Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton neck and neck, online it's a different story. Each candidate has their strengths and their weaknesses.
"To be right in the sweet spot of talked about culture...I've spent a lot of time trying to figure out why and it's hard to unpack that."
First, there was the fight for minimum wage. Now, there's another fight brewing in the workforce: predictable schedules for hourly workers.
More than 50 employees at the Los Angeles County Probation Department have received promotions, despite a history of disciplinary problems
The great outdoors doesn't seem at first blush like a hostile work environment, but for countless women working in the National Park Service, that's exactly what it is.
Over the weekend, tens of thousands of people marched through Mexico City in protest against a government proposal to legalize same-sex marriage.
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