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6 ways recreational pot would change California — and 7 ways it would not

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California's Prop 64 would make recreational marijuana legal in the state. If the law passes, it would mean a big shift in the way the Golden State — already the largest market for pot in the U.S. — regulates marijuana.

California's Prop 64 would make recreational marijuana legal in the state.   If the law passes, it would mean a big shift in the way the Golden State — already the largest market for pot in the U.S. — regulates marijuana. It could also mean big changes in enforcement, as well as the habits and health of Californians. We'll go into some details of every aspect of the measure in Take Two's special exploring the issue, but first, we take a look at how life in the Golden State would and wouldn't change if the law's passed.

What questions to do you have about the measure's possible passage? Let us know in the comments below!

You won't be able to buy pot at every store

You won't be able to smoke marijuana everywhere

You'll know how strong different strains of pot are

Kushmart, one of the largest medical dispensaries in downtown Los Angeles, currently has 55 strains of marijuana. In November, California voters could decide to make recreational marijuana use legal.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
Kushmart, one of the largest medical dispensaries in downtown Los Angeles, currently has 55 strains of marijuana. In November, California voters could decide to make recreational marijuana use legal.

Recreational pot shops won't open until January 2018

There will be very few marijuana-related arrests

The black market won't go away overnight

... Neither will drug-related crime

Coalinga Police Chief Michael Salvador has been a police officer for 30 years. Salvador says for the past 20 years he's been dealing with the results of Prop 215 passing – legalizing medical marijuana in California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
Coalinga Police Chief Michael Salvador has been a police officer for 30 years. Salvador says for the past 20 years he's been dealing with the results of Prop 215 passing – legalizing medical marijuana in California.

Driving while high will be illegal, but difficult to enforce

California's pot market will spike, and the state could make more than $1B in tax revenue

Big Marijuana could be the next Big Tobacco

It's unclear if there would be an uptick in teen use

... But there is evidence emergency room visits, especially by children, would rise

Cannabis-infused flavored drinks are sold at Kushmart, one of the largest medical marijuana dispensaries in downtown Los Angeles, on Monday afternoon, Feb. 29, 2016. If recreational marijuana is legalized in California, it could take more forms like specialized oils, drinks and food with regulated amounts of THC.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
Cannabis-infused flavored drinks are sold at Kushmart, one of the largest medical marijuana dispensaries in downtown Los Angeles, on Monday afternoon, Feb. 29, 2016. If recreational marijuana is legalized in California, it could take more forms like specialized oils, drinks and food with regulated amounts of THC.

The way people use marijuana changed in Colorado and it could in California too

Series: From Gold To Green

This story is part of Take Two's special coverage on what the legalization of recreational pot could mean for California's economy, criminal justice system and society. 

Read more in this series and let us know your thoughts and questions below in the comments section or on Take Two's Facebook page.

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