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For many faith-based communities in the US, ‘religious liberty’ has few limitations

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Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks during a press conference to announce he has vetoed legislation allowing clergy to refuse performing gay marriage and protecting people who refuse to attend the ceremonies Monday, March 28, 2016, in Atlanta. The Republican rejected the bill on Monday, saying, "I do not think that we have to discriminate against anyone to protect the faith-based community in Georgia."  (AP Photo/David Goldman)
David Goldman/AP
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks during a press conference to announce he has vetoed legislation allowing clergy to refuse performing gay marriage and protecting people who refuse to attend the ceremonies Monday, March 28, 2016, in Atlanta. The Republican rejected the bill on Monday, saying, "I do not think that we have to discriminate against anyone to protect the faith-based community in Georgia." (AP Photo/David Goldman)

What protections, if any, do faith-based communities across this country have?

On Monday, Georgia Governor Nathan Deal vetoed a controversial bill which would have allowed faith-based organizations to deny services and jobs to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.

Supporters said the measure was meant to protect religious freedom. Governor Deal, however, saw things differently:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6C1EoVmfEc

Quote: "I do not think that we have to discriminate against anyone to protect the faith-based community in Georgia, of which I and my family have been a part of for all of our lives."

Georgia is hardly the first state push religious liberty legislation.

Arizona, Indiana and Louisiana have each grappled with the concept. 

In the presidential race, Republican Ted Cruz has made religious freedom a cornerstone of his campaign.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgthjWZNB5Q

What protections, if any, do faith-based communities across this country have? How has our idea of religious liberty evolved over the years? And how is the concept of religious freedom playing into current politics?

Take Two put these questions to two guests.

Guests:

Jessica Levinson, clinical professor of law at Loyola Law School

Brie Loskota, executive director of the Center for Religion and Civic Culture at USC

Press the blue play button above to hear the interview.  

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