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How does the viral Internet fame cycle end? With a backlash

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A screenshot of the viral "Damn Daniel" video.
Twitter
A screenshot of the viral "Damn Daniel" video.

The "Damn Daniel" video is just the latest craze to add to the long list of viral Internet sensations. The fame can come with perks, but there's a dark side too.

It's easier than ever to become famous, or at least famous on the Internet, these days.

Take the case of California teens Daniel Lara and Josh Holz: 



Damn Daniel


— josh (@Josholzz)

The "Damn Daniel" video that blew up Twitter is just the latest craze to add to the long list of viral Internet sensations— think the "prancercise lady" or Alex from Target.

While the online fame can come with big perks, there's also a darker side— like getting hacked, "swatted," or harassed. 

Caitlin Dewey, digital culture critic at The Washington Post, joined Take Two to discuss "The dark side of going viral that no one talks about" and why it seems to be getting worse.

To hear the full interview, click the link above.

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