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Could ‘Insight Policing’ save black lives?

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A young girl raises her fist along with others after Baltimore authorities released a report on the death of Freddie Gray on May 1, 2015, in Baltimore, Maryland. Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore City state's attorney, ruled the death of Freddie Gray a homicide and that criminal charges will be filed. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody.
Win McNamee/Getty Images
A young girl raises her fist along with others after Baltimore authorities released a report on the death of Freddie Gray on May 1, 2015

Researchers are exploring some new solutions to an old problem.

The arrest of Sandra Bland has added fuel to a long-running national debate about the way police officers communicate with people of color.

What started as a routine traffic stop, quickly escalated to a heated exchange between Bland and officer Brian Encina. However, one expert says the exchange never needed to reach the level that it did. 

Enter Insight Policing: a new conflict resolution method out of George Mason University. It's designed bridge the gap between law enforcement and the people they’re sworn to protect.

Megan Price is the director of the Insight Conflict Resolution Program at George Mason University. She analyzed audio clips from the Sandra Bland arrest for Take Two.

Press the play button above to hear more about Insight Policing.

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