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Hollywood diversity, Al Qaeda & Paris, Facebook missing child alerts

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File: A Darth Vader costume from the Star Wars film series is displayed during the presentation of the exhibition 'Star Wars Identities' at the Cite du Cinema in Saint-Denis, outside Paris, on Feb. 13, 2014.
Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images
File: A Darth Vader costume from the Star Wars film series is displayed during the presentation of the exhibition 'Star Wars Identities' at the Cite du Cinema in Saint-Denis, outside Paris, on Feb. 13, 2014.

With Oscar nominations just around the corner, how do the current crop of awards movies and TV shows reflect gains made in Hollywood's diversity? And, Facebook may be developing its own version of Amber Alerts. Plus, the highly-anticipated debut of Marvel's Star Wars comic book.

Last weekend's Golden Globes awards were heralded as a moment for diversity, but just how much progress has been made in reflecting real American audiences?
The arm Al Qaeda of Arabian Penisula claimed responsibility for the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo last week in Paris. What is it?
This week, outgoing U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is in California as part of a three-day farewell tour. Tuesday, he visited the Marine Corp Air Station in Miramar.
It’s that time of the year when you're likely to hear "Put your coat on! You'll catch a cold!" But we all know that cold weather doesn’t actually cause colds, right?
While AMBER alerts have run on radio, tv and those digital signs on the freeway, they should start showing up in another familiar place - Facebook.
The public knows Ezell Ford as the unarmed man who was shot and killed by LAPD officers last summer. But not much else has been learned about his life since.
Wednesday is the third day of a week-long strike by mental health workers and other staff at Kaiser Permanente in California. One reason for the picket line: A lack of staffing.
When an American site or installation is attacked by guns or bombs, we know what happens: the military is deployed and Congress might even vote to declare war. But if the US declares a cyberwar, what does that even look like?
This week, CNN and the Federal Aviation Administration announced an agreement to study the use of drones to help better understand how they might be used to gather news.
It comes from a galaxy far far away ... or right around the corner at your local comic book shop.
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