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Mayo lawsuit: What defines mayonnaise?

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In this photo taken Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013, CEO Josh Tetrick holds a species of yellow pea used to make Just Mayo, a plant-based mayonnaise, at Hampton Creek Foods in San Francisco. Can plants replace eggs? A San Francisco startup backed by Bill Gates believes they can. Hampton Creek Foods is scouring the planet for plants that can replace chicken eggs in everything from cookies to omelets to French toast. Funded by prominent Silicon Valley investors, the upstart seeks to disrupt a global egg industry that backers say wastes energy, pollutes the environment, causes disease outbreaks and confines chickens to tiny spaces. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Eric Risberg/AP
In this photo taken Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013, CEO Josh Tetrick holds a species of yellow pea used to make Just Mayo, a plant-based mayonnaise, at Hampton Creek Foods in San Francisco. Can plants replace eggs? A San Francisco startup backed by Bill Gates believes they can. Hampton Creek Foods is scouring the planet for plants that can replace chicken eggs in everything from cookies to omelets to French toast. Funded by prominent Silicon Valley investors, the upstart seeks to disrupt a global egg industry that backers say wastes energy, pollutes the environment, causes disease outbreaks and confines chickens to tiny spaces. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Hellman's has sued a small California company for using the name "Just Mayo" to describe its product. Candice Choi, food industry writer with the Associated Press, gives Take Two the dish.

While the mere thought of mayonnaise may make some people queasy, most Americans love the goopy white stuff.

Even the word mayonnaise itself seems to have a lot of cache.

Hellman's has sued a small California company for using the name "Just Mayo" to describe its product.

To give Take Two the dish on this is Candice Choi, food industry writer with the Associated Press. 
 

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