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Apple's new iOS8 keeps user data private, even from police

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A Chinese man talking on his smartphone walks into an Apple store in Beijing Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. An Apple supplier in China is violating safety and pay rules despite the computer giant’s promises to improve conditions, two activist groups said Thursday ahead of the release of the iPhone 6. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
Andy Wong/AP
A Chinese man talking on his smartphone walks into an Apple store in Beijing Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. An Apple supplier in China is violating safety and pay rules despite the computer giant’s promises to improve conditions, two activist groups said Thursday ahead of the release of the iPhone 6. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

The company announced it won't be able to turn over data from most iPhones and iPads to police even if they have a search warrant.

Apple on Wednesday released the latest version of its operating system, iOS8, for iPhones and iPads.

It features a bunch of new bells and whistles and, more notably, some new security measures — of which, the device maker announced, Apple won't be able to turn over data from most iPhones and iPads to police even if they have a search warrant.

Some critics are concerned this move by Apple could have negative implications for law enforcement by preventing access to data that could help prosecute criminal cases. 

Cyrus Farivar, senior business editor for Ars Technica, and Adam Gershowitz, law professor at William and Mary Law School in Virginia, say this is great for privacy advocates but problematic for law enforcement.

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