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The faith and family behind Hobby Lobby

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Activists hold signs outside the Supreme Court March 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court heard arguments today in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc if for profit corporations can refuse to cover contraceptive services in their employee's healthcare for religious beliefs.
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
Activists hold signs outside the Supreme Court March 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court heard arguments today in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc if for profit corporations can refuse to cover contraceptive services in their employee's healthcare for religious beliefs.

The Green family, founders of the chain store Hobby Lobby, has worked to preserve and promote its own brand of religion to extend far beyond just the one case it argued before the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court dealt a blow to the President's Affordable Care Act when it ruled that the craft store chain Hobby Lobby's religious rights outweighed the rights by their female employees to obtain full contraceptive coverage provided by the law.

At heart in that decision was the court's view that the chain's owners, the Green family, had a deeply sincere religious belief against certain contraceptives. However the Green family's work to preserve and promote its own brand of religion extends far beyond just this one case

Nirvi Shah, deputy managing editor for Politico, explains that the family has spent millions supporting religious curricula in schools, donating to Christian universities and creating a museum dedicated to the Bible in DC.

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