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App Chat: 5 apps for lounging by the pool with a cold drink

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NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 28:  A boy jumps as people bathe on opening day of the newly renovated McCarren Park Pool on June 28, 2012 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The historic 37,000 square-foot pool had been closed since 1983 but has been rejuvenated by a $50 million restoration. New York City public swimming pools opened today for the summer.   (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 28: A boy jumps as people bathe on opening day of the newly renovated McCarren Park Pool on June 28, 2012 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The historic 37,000 square-foot pool had been closed since 1983 but has been rejuvenated by a $50 million restoration. New York City public swimming pools opened today for the summer. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

It's hot out. So, we have a list of apps that'll help you sit around the pool, get drunk and save your baby soft skin from turning to leather.

Here in Southern California, the temperature has already made it into the low 90s. While I was not prepared to turn on the dusty air conditioner in my oven of an apartment for another couple of months, I thought that it would be very nice to sit by a pool and relax.

So, I've put together a list of apps that'll come in hand when you're sitting at the pool with a beverage in hand. Cheers to delectable drinks and sun proof skin. 

All about the drinks:

1) Vivino: For those who want to know more about the wine they're buying, this app lets users simply scan wine labels with their phone for more information. When you scan a wine, it provides things like an average price, rating, tasting notes, how that particular year compares to others, the type of grape, where to buy the wine and what foods would pair well with it. The only problem is that since the app is partially user-driven, there isn't a lot of information on it.

2) Craft Check: The quintessential NPR listener's app. Scan a beer's barcode and this will check if it comes from a craft brewery. The standards for craft brew are set by the Brewers Association and they include no flavored malt beverages, the brewery in question can't produce more than six million barrels a year and that no more than 25 percent of the brewery is owned by a non craft brewer. Basically, they want to weed out things like Shock Top, which is produced by Anheuser-Busch InBev, the same company that brews Budweiser. The problem with the app? Other than it's ridiculously hoity-toity, it doesn't give any descriptions of the beer that you scan outside of letting you know if it's a craft beer or not. Because even if it's craft, it can still be awful.

3) Liquor Cabinet: Simply put in the ingredients you have in your liquor cabinet and your kitchen and this will create recipes for you. Add your own if you find that it's lacking.

Keeping your skin safe:

4) Ultraviolet: This app catalogs the UV Index for your area and recommends things like how long you should say in the sun and what SPF sunscreen you should be wearing. 

5) Think Dirty: If you take a look at the sunscreen you're slathering on your body, you'll see that there's a laundry list of ingredients that you don't understand. This app lets you scan a products' label, and then it breaks down the list of ingredients for you. It tells you if any ingredients have been tied to studies that indicate that they cause cancer, or are hormone uptake inhibitors. The problem? There aren't always extensive studies to back the claims made by the app regarding certain ingredients. And not all of the products I scanned came up in the app.

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