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Big pharma's push for the female 'viagra' pill, Osphena

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AURORA, CO - MARCH 27: Pharmacy director Hank Wedemeyer looks up records while filling a prescription at a community health center on March 27, 2012 in Aurora, Colorado. The center, called the Metro Community Provider Network, has received some 6,000 more Medicaid eligable patients since the healthcare reform law was passed in 2010. Expansion of such clinics nationwide is considered key to serving the millions more patients set to be be covered by Medicaid if the healthcare reform passes the current challenge in the Supreme Court. Preventative health services and treatments at community health centers are also designed to reduce emergency room expenditures, which are up to 10 times more costly. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
John Moore/Getty Images
Pharmacy director Hank Wedemeyer looks up records while filling a prescription at a community health center on March 27, 2012 in Aurora, Colorado.

The Food and Drug Administration recently approved a drug called Osphena, a drug that some are calling the female equivalent of viagra. It's headed to market next month.

The Food and Drug Administration recently approved a drug called Osphena, a drug that some are calling the female equivalent of viagra. It's headed to market next month.

Its makers claim it will help women who experience painful sex during menopause, and are hoping it will be the next blockbuster drug. But do women really need it? Jennifer Block has been writing about this medication for Newsweek, she joins the show with more. 

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