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Take Two for February 12, 2013

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This file picture taken on December 31, 2012 shows Pope Benedict XVI arriving to pray in front of the nativity crib in Saint Peter's Square after celebrating the Vespers and Te Deum prayers in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI on February 11, 2013 announced he will resign on February 28, a Vatican spokesman told AFP, which will make him the first pope to do so in centuries.
ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images
This file picture taken on December 31, 2012 shows Pope Benedict XVI arriving to pray in front of the nativity crib in Saint Peter's Square after celebrating the Vespers and Te Deum prayers in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI on February 11, 2013 announced he will resign on February 28, a Vatican spokesman told AFP, which will make him the first pope to do so in centuries.

We look at who might step into Pope Benedict XVI's shoes after he leaves his post. Then, a look at the rising popularity of Pentecostalism among Latinos, Josie Huang reports on military vets working in Hollywood, a SoCal group uses lasers to make 3D models of California's missions, and much more.

Speculation is mounting over who will succeed Pope Benedict the sixteenth. Will it be a liberal or a conservative, and what does that even mean? Joining us to define terms is senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter, John Allen.
While the Latino population of Catholics is fast-growing, influential and will no doubt have some bearing on the choice of the new pope, the church that once dominated Latin America now has serious competition from Pentecostalism.
This week the Federal Trade Commission released a report saying that one in 20 consumers had significant errors on their credit reports, mistakes that could lower their credit scores, making them pay more for things like auto and home loans.
Wrestling is down for the count at the 2020 Olympic Games.
The SAP Open tennis tournament is moving on after 125 years in the Bay Area. It's been home to some of the tennis greats, like John McEnroe, Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras.
This week for our New Music Tuesday segment, we turn our attention north to San Francisco. That's where you'll find Thao Nguyen, the Vietnamese-American lead singer of the indie rock band Thao and the Get Down Stay Down.
President Obama addresses the nation tonight in his fifth State of the Union speech. The focus will be jobs and the economy, but he's also expected to announce the withdrawal of 34,000 troops from Afghanistan.
Patt Morrison joins take two to talk about what kinds of infractions can get an officer fired from the LAPD. In light of Christopher Dorner's accusations and subsequent dismissal Morrisson will look at how typical this case is.
A cover story in Esquire magazine about a former Navy Seal is generating lots of controversy. According to the report, the unnamed Seal claims he was the man who actually killed Osama Bin Laden.
Veterans who've already gained a toehold in the entertainment business are helping newcomers break in, and the rest of the industry may be following suit. Josie Huang reports.
We speak with author and map collector Simon Garfield about his latest book, "On The Map: A Mind Expanding Exploration of the Way the World Looks," which charts the history of map making and the way maps showcase the best and worst of human nature.
Lasers can do more than taunt your tabby: a California non-profit is using thousands of lasers to create 3D digital models of the 28 cultural heritage sites along the state's El Camino Real.
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