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‘More human than human’: we discuss the impact and influence of Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner

English director Ridley Scott poses during a photocall for the movie out of competition "Blade Runner: The final cut" during the 64th Venice International Film Festival at Venice Lido 01 september 2007.        (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE SIMON/AFP/GettyImages)
CHRISTOPHE SIMON/AFP/Getty Images
English director Ridley Scott poses during a photocall for the movie "Blade Runner: The Final Cut" during the 64th Venice International Film Festival at Venice Lido in 2007.

With the release of the new “Blade Runner: 2049,” the much-anticipated sequel to the 1982 sci-fi classic “Blade Runner,” AirTalk takes a look at the influence and impact that Ridley Scott’s original version had on the sci-fi genre.

With the release of the new “Blade Runner: 2049,” the much-anticipated sequel to the 1982 sci-fi classic “Blade Runner,” AirTalk takes a look at the influence and impact that Ridley Scott’s original version had on the sci-fi genre.

The initial 1982 reception of “Blade Runner” was mixed, but the film has since been acknowledged as a seminal building block for modern filmmakers. From Scott’s incredibly detailed set designs to the association of neon lights with The Future, “Blade Runner” changed the landscape of cinema for decades to come.

Join Larry and the critics as they discuss the film’s unique features and influences, and reach out with your own connection to “Blade Runner” by calling 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Claudia Puig, film critic for KPCC and president of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association; she tweets

Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC, Alt-Film Guide and CineGods.com; he tweets

Charles Solomon, film critic for KPCC, Animation Scoop and Animation Magazine

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