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Majority Of Americans Want Help Aging At Home, What Can The Government Do To Help?

ROME, ITALY - MARCH 16: Giulia Baini, 24, a volunteer from the Community of Sant'Egidio, speaks to Giovanna, a frail elderly woman of 82 years of age during a home-care service on March 16, 2020 in Rome, Italy. The Italian Government has taken the unprecedented measure of a nationwide lockdown by closing all businesses except essential services such as, pharmacies, grocery stores, hardware stores, tobacconists and banks, in an effort to fight the world's second-most deadly Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak outside of China. Journeys are allowed only for work reasons and health reasons proven by a medical certificate. Citizens are encourage to stay home and have an obligation to respect a safety distance of one metre from each other in supermarkets or in public spaces. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images
A volunteer from the Community of Sant'Egidio, speaks to an elderly woman during a home-care service on March 16, 2020 in Rome, Italy.

A new poll conducted in late March by the Associated Press and NORC Center for Public Affairs Research noted that 88% of the public would like to live their twilight years in their home as opposed to a long-term care facility.

A new pollconducted in late March by the Associated Press and NORC Center for Public Affairs Research noted that 88% of the public would like to live their twilight years in their home as opposed to a long-term care facility.

And for good reason, with some long-term care facilities having a track record of health violations and mistreatment of residents, it leaves people wanting alternatives to the current systems set in place for elderly care. With that in mind-- what is the best way to achieve this?

Part of the reason families even put their elderly in a facility is due to financial restraints, with most people not being able to afford a private caretaker that can assist a family’s older relatives on a day-to-day basis.

It’s these problems that politicians have tried to address, whether it be at the federal level or the state. In the state of California, governor Gavin Newsom’s administration released a master plan for aging, a comprehensive framework that would in theory assist families that need help taking care of its elderly family members at home. This also plays in with the push for greater federal funding for at-home care, with the Biden administration looking to add a $400 billion expansion of caretaking services through his infrastructure plan.

Today on AirTalk, we talk to one of the experts who played a part in California’s master plan, as well as an expert who can speak to recent technology developments that will benefit people trying to age at home. Do you support elderly getting the chance to age at home? What policies do you think could be implemented? Join the conversation and call us at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Donna Benton, research associate professor of gerontology at USC; she was also appointed to the Stakeholder Advisory Committee for the CA Master Plan for Aging; she tweets

Pinchas Cohen, M.D., professor of gerontology, medicine and biological sciences and dean of the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at USC

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