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COVID-19: What We Can Learn About COVID Patients’ Recovery From Damaged Sense Of Smell Virus Causes

SEATTLE, WA - APRIL 17: Medical laboratory scientist, Alicia Bui, runs a clinical test in the Immunology lab at UW Medicine looking for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, a virus strain that causes coronavirus disease (COVID-19) on April 17, 2020 in Seattle, Washington. The plasma she is examining came from donors who have recovered from COVID-19, a contagious respiratory illness, and may have the potential to help combat the disease in others. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)
Karen Ducey/Getty Images
Medical laboratory scientist, Alicia Bui, runs a clinical test in the Immunology lab at UW Medicine looking for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, a virus strain that causes coronavirus disease (COVID-19) on April 17, 2020 in Seattle, Washington.

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Shruti Gohil, professor of medicine and associate medical director for epidemiology and infection prevention at UC Irvine’s School of Medicine.

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Shruti Gohil, professor of medicine and associate medical director for epidemiology and infection prevention at UC Irvine’s School of Medicine.

Today’s topics include: 

  • LAT: California shatters records as surge worsens
  • Pasadena says it will not follow L.A. County order to suspend outdoor dining
  • NYT: Evidence Builds That an Early Mutation Made the Pandemic Harder to Stop
  • WSJ: Damaged Sense of Smell in COVID Patients Holds Clues to How Recovery Might Work
  • Washington Post: Vaccines Face Trust Gap in Black, Latino Communities

Guest:

Shruti Gohil, M.D., professor of medicine and associate medical director for epidemiology and infection prevention at UC Irvine’s School of Medicine

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