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Here’s What We Know About The Election So Far

Ballots are counted at the Los Angeles County Regional Offices in Downey, California on November 3, 2020, after the polls closed for the 2020 US Elections. - President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden are battling it out for the White House, with polls closed across the United States Tuesday -- and a long night of waiting for results in key battlegrounds on the cards. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP) (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
Ballots are counted at the Los Angeles County Regional Offices in Downey, California on November 3, 2020, after the polls closed for the 2020 US Elections.

Los Angeles County election officials have been posting election returns since Tuesday night, providing an early glimpse at the fate of the Los Angeles District Attorney race, closely watched LAUSD and city council contests, and several of the most expensive ballot measures in California history.

Los Angeles County election officials have been posting election returns since Tuesday night, providing an early glimpse at the fate of the Los Angeles District Attorney race, closely watched LAUSD and city council contests, and several of the most expensive ballot measures in California history.

The results could change dramatically in the coming days -- the process of counting the vote will take time. By law, county election officials have 31 days to report results. Some races will be called this evening, but the final outcome of many, including the presidential contest, may not be clear tonight. Or tomorrow.

Read more on LAist

Guests:

Fernando Guerra, professor of political science and Chicano/Latino studies and director of the Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University; honorary member of the KPCC Board of Trustees

Rob Stutzman, Republican political consultant and president of Stutzman Public Affairs; former deputy chief of staff to Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger; he tweets

Sonja Diaz, founding executive director of the Latino Policy and Politics Initiative at UCLA, a non partisan think tank; she’s also a practicing civil rights attorney and policy adviser; she tweets

Michael Alvarez, professor of political and computational social science at Caltech and co-director of the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project; he tweets

Libby Denkmann, KPCC politics reporter; she tweets

Kyle Stokes, KPCC/LAist reporter covering K-12 education and the Los Angeles Unified School District; he tweets

Joel Fox, editor-in-chief of the political commentary website Fox and Hounds Daily and the former president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association from 1986 to 1998; he tweets

Raphe Sonenshein, executive director of the Pat Brown Institute of Public Affairs at Cal State LA; he tweets

Mike Madrid, co-founder of the Lincoln Project and Republican political strategist for the Sacramento-based public affairs firm GrassrootsLab; he tweets

Matt Barreto, professor of political science and Chicano/a Studies at UCLA and co-founder of the research and polling firm Latino Decisions; he is also a pollster for the Biden campaign; he tweets

Neal Kelley, Registrar of Voters for Orange County, California

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