Member-supported news for Southern California
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Support for KPCC comes from:

Why Alabama’s New Abortion Law Probably Won’t Reach The Supreme Court

MONTGOMERY, AL - MAY 15: The Alabama State Capitol stands on May 15, 2019 in Montgomery, Alabama. Today Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signed a near-total ban on abortion into state law. (Photo by Julie Bennett/Getty Images)
Julie Bennett/Getty Images
Alabama Lawmakers Vote To Ban Abortion Within State

Alabama's Republican governor has now signed the most stringent abortion legislation in the nation, making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases, punishable by up to life in prison, and with no exceptions for rape and incest.

Alabama's Republican governor has now signed the most stringent abortion legislation in the nation, making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases, punishable by up to life in prison, and with no exceptions for rape and incest.

Gov. Kay Ivey said the law she signed Wednesday is a testament to the belief of many supporters that "every life is a sacred gift from God."

Democrats and abortion rights advocates call it a slap in the face to women.

The abortion ban would go into effect in six months if it isn't blocked by legal challenges.

Kentucky, Mississippi, Ohio and Georgia recently approved bans on abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can occur in about the sixth week of pregnancy. Missouri's Republican-led Senate voted early Thursday to ban abortions at eight weeks, with no rape or incest exceptions.

Larry and his guests talk about the spates of new restrictive abortion laws and their impact on Roe v. Wade.

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Dan Goldberg, NY-based health care reporter at POLITICO who’s been following the story; he tweets  

Jody Armour, professor of law at University of Southern California

Stay Connected