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As Dems turn attention to Trump’s tax returns, a look at the power of Ways and Means

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30:  Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal (D-MA) (C) speaks while flanked by Rep. John Larson (D-CT) (L) and Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) during an event to introduce legislation called the Social Security 2100 Act. which would increase increase benefits and strengthen the fund, during a news conference on Capitol Hill January 30, 2019 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal (D-MA) (C) speaks while flanked by Rep. John Larson (D-CT) (L) and Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) during an event to introduce legislation called the Social Security 2100 Act.

A House committee chairman has formally requested the IRS provide six years of President Donald Trump's personal and business tax returns as Democrats try to shed light on his complex financial dealings and potential conflicts of interest.

A House committee chairman has formally requested the IRS provide six years of President Donald Trump's personal and business tax returns as Democrats try to shed light on his complex financial dealings and potential conflicts of interest.  

The request Wednesday by Massachusetts Rep. Richard Neal, who heads the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, is the first such demand for a sitting president's tax information in 45 years. The unprecedented move is likely to set off a huge legal battle between Democrats controlling the House and the Trump administration.

Neal made the request in a letter to IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig, asking for Trump's personal and business returns for 2013 through 2018.

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Laura Davison, tax reporter with Bloomberg who has been following the story; she tweets

Kirk J. Stark, professor of tax law and policy at UCLA

Andy Grewal, law professor at the University of Iowa where he specializes in tax law, administrative law, statutory interpretation and constitutional law

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