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How does SoCal get its local news?

CHESTER, PA - APRIL 3:  Media microphones are placed on a stand in advance of a press conference with National Transportation Safety Board Investigators Ryan Frigo and Jim Southworth about the crash of Amtrak Palmetto Train 89 on April 3, 2016 in Chester, PA.  Two people are confirmed dead after the lead engine of the train struck a backhoe that was on the track south of Philadelphia.  Approximately 341 passengers and seven crew members onboard the train, which was traveling from New York to Savannah, according to Amtrak. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Mark Makela/Getty Images
Media microphones are placed on a stand in advance of a press conference with National Transportation Safety Board Investigators Ryan Frigo and Jim Southworth about the crash of Amtrak Palmetto Train 89 on April 3, 2016 in Chester, PA.

TV, Radio, newspapers, the web. There are so many different places where people can turn to to find local news -- but what’s king? And how does it differ among different communities?

TV, Radio, newspapers, the web. There are so many different places where people can turn to to find local news -- but what’s king? And how does it differ among different communities?

Pew Research Center’s recent “What are the local news dynamics in your city?” project surveyed nearly 35,000 adults to better understand how their geographic communities preferred local news.

In Los Angeles, 40 percent of surveyed adults said television was their preferred method of local news consumption, with KABC TV and KTLA TV being the top source, both coming in at 7 percent. 26 percent of adults turn to news website and apps and social media comes in at 17 percent. Radio, yours truly, came in last, with 8 percent of adults choosing it as their local news source.

And the topic cited as most “important for daily life?” The weather.

Additionally, the survey attempted to capture whether those living in SoCal feel connected to the local media. 57 percent of those surveyed felt that local journalists were in touch with the community, and 38 percent felt that the news media had influence on their community.

We parse the survey results.

Plus, what’s your preferred method of consuming local news? How do you feel about SoCal’s local media landscape? How connected are you to it?

Guests:

Amy Mitchell, director of Journalism Research at Pew Research Center, where she was the lead on the recent project “What are the local news dynamics in your city?” 

Ken Doctor, media analyst who focuses on the transformation of consumer media in the digital age; author of “Newsonomics: Twelve New Trends That Will Shape the News You Get” (St. Martin’s Press, 2010)

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