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Supreme Court expansion is getting traction among some Dems as an election issue -- who’s buying in, who’s not and how it might work

The US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on January 22, 2019. - The US Supreme Court on Tuesday allowed US President Donald Trump's restrictions on transgender military service to take effect pending the outcome of litigation on the sensitive issue. The White House had asked the Supreme Court to intervene after lower courts prohibited Trump's administration from implementing the controversial restrictions. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP)        (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images
The US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on January 22, 2019.

Some Democratic presidential candidates are suggesting expanding the number of justices in the Supreme Court if elected president.

Some Democratic presidential candidates are suggesting expanding the number of justices in the Supreme Court if elected president.

The list includes Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren and Kirsten Gillibrand saying they would be open to expanding the high court and adding term limitations for justices. The idea of “court-packing” isn’t a new one either. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s plan failed nearly a century ago to expand the high court to 15 Supreme Court justices.

Larry talks to with two democratic strategists about who’s buying into court packing, who’s not, and how making that big of a change might work.

What do you think about expanding the high court? Do you have any thoughts on term limitations for Supreme Court justices?

Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Sean McElwee, director of polling and research for Pack The Courts, a group advocating for Democratic candidates to support an expansion of the Supreme Court’s membership; he is also the co-founder of Data For Progress, which provides polling and research on left issues, and a contributor to The Nation; he tweets

Matt Rodriguez, Democratic strategist and founder and chief executive officer of Rodriguez Strategies. He is also a former senior Obama advisor in 2008; he tweets

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