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Revisiting the conversation on ‘traditional masculinity,’ after the American Psychological Association labels it harmful

Captain Clark and his men shooting bears. Original Artwork: From  'Journal of Voyages' by Peter Gass - pub 1811   (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Captain Clark and his men shooting bears. Original Artwork: From 'Journal of Voyages' by Peter Gass - pub 1811.

Two weeks ago, we started debating the American Psychological Association’s official guidelines for working with boys and men, which claimed that “traditional masculinity” is psychologically harmful.

Two weeks ago, we started debating the American Psychological Association’sofficial guidelines for working with boys and men, which claimed that “traditional masculinity” is psychologically harmful.

According to the guide, despite differences in masculinity across cultures, the most comprehensive definition includes: “anti-femininity, achievement, eschewal of the appearance of weakness, and adventure, risk, and violence.” Men who are socialized with this ideology aremore likely to suppress their emotions, engage in risky and aggressive behavior and are more reluctant to ask for psychological help.

Today, we take some more time to continue the conversation.

What do you think about the APA’s decision? Do you think traditional masculinity is harmful?

Weigh in and call us at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Fredric Rabinowitz, psychologist and professor at the University of Redlands; he co-authored the guidelines and was formerly the president (2005) of the APA's Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinity 

Samuel Veissière, assistant professor of psychiatry and anthropology and co-director of the Culture, Mind, and Brain Program at McGill University in Montreal, Canada 

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