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When it comes to political views, is there a generational divide among immigrant communities? What OC’s Vietnamese American community tells us...

A protester holds a Vietnamese flag red flag with gold star designed in 1940 and used during an uprising against French rule in southern Vietnam, during a rally against the visit of Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc to the White House in Washington, DC on May 31, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS        (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images
A protester holds a Vietnamese flag red flag with gold star designed in 1940 and used during an uprising against French rule in southern Vietnam, during a rally against the visit of Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc to the White House in Washington, DC on May 31, 2017.

Earlier this month, the Trump administration reportedly moved to reinterpret a 2008 agreement that protected pre-1995 Vietnamese immigrants in the U.S. from deportation.

Earlier this month, the Trump administration reportedlymoved to reinterpret a 2008 agreement that protected pre-1995 Vietnamese immigrants in the U.S. from deportation.

The new reading would alter these protections by making Vietnamese immigrants who have been convicted of crime eligible for deportation. News of the threat led to protests in Little Saigon against the Trump Administration’s possible deportation tactic.

The rally, however, unveiled a generational divide between those who took to the streets and those who decided not to participate. As reported by the LA Times’ Anh Do, younger Vietnamese-Americans more often advocate against deportation, while the older generation— whom are largely Republican and traditional— tend to stay silent on the topic of deportation. So why is this split happening? Does this divide between generations occur among other immigrant communities?

If you’ve experienced a generational divide when it comes to discussing political issues, call us and weigh in at 866.893.5722.

With guest host Queena Kim.

Guests:

Anh Do, reporter at the Los Angeles Times who covers Asian American issues and Orange County news; she tweets

Fernando Guerra, professor of political science and Chicana/o Latina/o Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University; he is a member of the Southern California Public Radio Board of Trustees

Thu-Huong Nguyen-Vo, Associate Professor of Asian languages and cultures and Asian American Studies at UCLA

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