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Given threat of wildfires, should the Tejon Ranch project be approved?

GORMAN, CA - JUNE 30: Trucks cross the San Andreas Fault at Tejon Pass between Los Angeles and northern California, Interstate 5, on June 30, 2006 near Gorman, California. Scientists are warning that after more than 300 years, the southern end of the 800-mile-long San Andreas Fault north and east of Los Angeles has built up immense pressure that could trigger a massive earthquake at any time. Such a quake could produce a sudden lateral movement of 23 to 32 feet which would be would be among the largest ever recorded. By comparison, the 1906 earthquake at the northern end of the fault destroyed San Francisco with a movement of no more than about 21 feet. Experts believed that a quake of magnitude-7.6 or greater on the lower San Andreas could kill thousands of people in the Los Angeles area with damages running into the tens of billions of dollars. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
David McNew/Getty Images
Trucks cross the San Andreas Fault at Tejon Pass between Los Angeles and northern California, Interstate 5, on June 30, 2006 near Gorman, California

Next week, the LA County Board of Supervisors will decide whether to give the Tejon Ranch Centennial Project the green light.

Next week, the LA County Board of Supervisors will decide whether to give the Tejon Ranch Centennial Project the green light.

If approved, the contentious housing project would add 19,000 homes to a region that continues to struggle with affordable housing. Even so, critics of the project argue that the new homes would be nestled in a zone prone to wildfires. Is the Centennial Project the answer to LA County’s affordable housing project? Should the high fire risk discourage developers?  Larry Mantle sits down with a supporter and a critic of the project to weigh the benefits and the drawbacks.

Guests:

Char Miller, professor of environmental analysis and history at Pomona College

Barry Zoeller, vice president of corporate communications and investor relations at Tejon Ranch Co.; the company is behind the Centennial development project

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