Member-supported news for Southern California
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Support for KPCC comes from:

Weighing the pros and cons of a bill that would require CA doctors to disclose probation status

PANORAMA CITY, CA - JANUARY 28:  Dr. Jason Greenspan (L) and emergency room nurse Junizar Manansala care for a patient in the ER of Mission Community Hospital where doctors held a press conference outside on a class action lawsuit against the state of California by a coalition of emergency room physicians claiming that without additional funding, the entire emergency healthcare system is on the verge of collapse on January 28, 2009 in Panorama City, California. According to the coalition, the cost of providing emergency room treatment has nearly doubled over the past decade and patient load increased by more than 28 percent while Medi-Cal reimbursements have remained largely unchanged. During that time, 85 California hospitals in California have closed and an additional 55 facilities have shut down their emergency rooms.  California now reportedly ranks worst in the nation for access emergency care and last in emergency rooms per capita. California has seven emergency rooms per million people while the national average is 20 emergency rooms per million people.  (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Junizar Manansala;Jason Greenspan
David McNew/Getty Images
Dr. Jason Greenspan (L) and emergency room nurse Junizar Manansala care for a patient in the ER of Mission Community Hospital on January 28, 2009 in Panorama City, California.

If your doctor was on probation for an incident, say, involving medical malpractice, you’d probably want to know about it and maybe even want to change doctors, right?

If your doctor was on probation for an incident, say, involving medical malpractice, you’d probably want to know about it and maybe even want to change doctors, right?

But what about if your doctor was on probation for billing negligence? Would you feel the same way?

These are questions at the heart of proposed legislation that would require doctors to tell a patient at his or her first visit if they are on probation. SB 1448 would require doctors to give patients a form to sign that shows how long the probation period is and when it ends.

San Mateo Democrat Jerry Hill is the bill’s sponsor, and he says his bill will increase transparency between doctors and patients, as physicians are currently only required by law to notify their insurer and their hospital or clinic about probationary status.

Physicians and physician groups have already come out in opposition of the bill, saying that it would cause patients to go find another doctor before doing any research on the specific reasons for the probation. They add it may also put doctors in a position where they would rather fight allegations than settle in court and take probation, which could create a backlog in the probation system.

We debate the bill.

Guests:

Carmen Balber, executive director of Consumer Watchdog

Kavita Patel, M.D., nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution; she’s also a practicing primary care physician at Johns Hopkins Medicine; she tweets

Stay Connected