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Previewing Thursday’s vote on zero-emissions plan for ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach

A tug boat pushes the Hanjin Greece container ship to dock for unloading at the Port of Long Beach, California, on September 10, 2016. The ship had been stranded at sea for more than a week for fear that it could be seized by creditors if it came to shore.
A Hanjin Shipping spokesman said a US court had issued an order allowing it to unload some cargo without fear of creditors seizing its ships. As of late September 9, 92 of 141 ships being operated by the world's seventh largest shipping firm were stranded at sea.
 / AFP / DAVID MCNEW        (Photo credit should read DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images)
DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images
A tug boat pushes the Hanjin Greece container ship to dock for unloading at the Port of Long Beach, California, on September 10, 2016.

Commissioners with both of Southern California’s major ports are meeting on Thursday for a deciding vote on an update to the Clean Air Action Plan, aimed at helping reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Commissioners with both of Southern California’s major ports are meeting on Thursday for a deciding vote on an update to the Clean Air Action Plan, aimed at helping reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

In the new update, ports will be required to switch to zero-emission technology for cargo handling by 2030. Trucks will have to be zero-emissions by 2035. There are also new short and long term emissions reduction goals. The cost is slated to be between $8 and $14 billion.

The update was announced in July of this year, and AirTalk spoke with a panel of stakeholders from environmental, shipping, and trucking industries as well as the ports themselves about what the plan could mean for their industries and the people who work in them. With the vote looming, we’ll reconvene our discussion from the summer as a refresher on what’s at stake with this vote and how it could impact each of the industries involved.

Guests:

Rick Cameron, managing director of planning and environmental affairs at the Port of Long Beach

Morgan Wyenn, staff attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council

Thomas Jelenić, vice president of Pacific Merchant Shipping Association

Fred Potter, international vice president and director of the ports division for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which represents port truck drivers

Weston LaBar, executive director of the Harbor Trucking Association; he is also founding partner of PEAR Strategies, a public affairs and digital strategy firm based in Long Beach

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