Member-supported news for Southern California
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Support for KPCC comes from:

What’s next for CA gun laws after SCOTUS turns down concealed carry case?

One of two pro-gun activists protests against the Gun Buyback Program organized in the traditionally liberal Los Angeles during the LAPD Gun Buyback Program event  in the Van Nuys area of north Los Angeles  on December 26, 2012. By noon the LAPD had collected more then 420 handguns, rifles, shotguns and  assault rifles.   Los Angeles' no-questions-asked gun buyback event, where weapons could be exchanged for up to $200, was held  five months early after the Connecticut school shooting.   Critics question the effectiveness of gun buyback events, arguing that the weapons surrendered tend to be the least likely to be used in criminal activities, such as guns which are old or malfunctioning.      AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR        (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)
JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images
One of two pro-gun activists protests against the Gun Buyback Program organized in the traditionally liberal Los Angeles during the LAPD Gun Buyback Program event.

California and its gun laws have been making national news in the last week.

California and its gun laws have been making national news in the last week.

First, with the Supreme Court decision not to take on a case that looks into concealed carry reciprocity and our state’s limits on who can carry a gun in public. Then on Thursday a federal judge issued a preliminary injunction to block the disposal of large-capacity ammunition magazines in California. The law was supposed to go into effect this weekend.

How are gun rights advocates and gun control supporters reacting to the news? What’s next for these policies? And what else could be coming down the pipeline in the national and state-wide gun conversation?

Guests:

Lawrence Rosenthal, professor of law at Chapman University in Orange, California

Josh Blackman, an associate professor of Law at the South Texas College of Law who specializes in constitutional law; he is the author of “Unprecedented: The Constitutional Challenge to Obamacare” (Public Affairs, 2013); he tweets

Stay Connected