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Does the Civil Rights Act cover LGBTQ people -- SCOTUS likely to take up question

Applications for marriage licenses by gay couples in Guam came after U.S. District Judge Frances Tydingco-Gatewood on Friday struck down the country's prohibition on same-sex marriage.
Photo by Benson Kua via Flickr Creative Commons
Applications for marriage licenses by gay couples in Guam came after U.S. District Judge Frances Tydingco-Gatewood on Friday struck down the country's prohibition on same-sex marriage.

A federal appeals court in Chicago ruled yesterday that Civil Rights Act of 1964 extends workplace anti-discrimination protections to LGBTQ people, contradicting another decision handed down a month earlier by a different federal appellate court.

A federal appeals court in Chicago ruled yesterday that Civil Rights Act of 1964 extends workplace anti-discrimination protections to LGBTQ people, contradicting another decision handed down a month earlier by a different federal appellate court.

The case stems from a lawsuit filed by Kimberly Hively, an instructor at a community college in Indiana who alleged that the school had fired her because she is a lesbian.

The conflicting decisions likely means that the case would go all the way up to the Supreme Court. California already has strong anti-discrimination laws in place for the LGBTQ community, but the outcome of the Hively case will have national significance.

Guest:

Douglas NeJaime, visiting professor of law at Harvard Law School

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