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Why some voters simply won’t cast a ballot for a woman

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28:  Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and US Vice President nominee Tim Kaine acknowledge the crowd at the end on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and US Vice President nominee Tim Kaine acknowledge the crowd at the end on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Few times in the history of the United States, if ever, have we seen a presidential election with two more polarizing candidates.

Few times in the history of the United States, if ever, have we seen a presidential election with two more polarizing candidates.

We hear over and over again from voters who say they simply can’t stomach the thought of a Trump White House, and there are equally loud voices saying the same for Hillary Clinton. But while some voters won’t vote for Hillary because they don’t like here, there are others who won’t vote for Hillary or any female candidate simply because she’s a woman.

Rapper T.I. said late last year that he “can’t vote for the leader of the free world to be a woman” because a woman president might make “rash decisions emotionally.” And, of course, the arguments of Evangelicals and other religious voters against a woman as president are well-documented, often using Bible verses to explain why they don’t believe a woman is fit to be president.

Today on AirTalk, we’ll examine from a political, religious, and psychological point of view why some voters won’t vote for women and look at how this might impact the 2016 election.

Guests:

Julie Zauzmer, religion reporter for the Washington Post; she tweets

Nichole Bauer, assistant professor of political science at the University of Alabama

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