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Rounding up the good, bad and ugly impact of Pokemon Go

April O'Neil (L), Ariana Nussdorf (C) and Julia Voth (R) display their cellphones while playing Pokemon Go at Pershing Square in Los Angeles, California, one of a number of landmark locations across communities in southern California which serving as gathering point for people playing the game.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images
April O'Neil (L), Ariana Nussdorf (C) and Julia Voth (R) display their cellphones while playing Pokemon Go at Pershing Square in Los Angeles, California, one of a number of landmark locations across communities in southern California which serving as gathering point for people playing the game.

For millennials who played the original video game, Pokemon Go has sparked a nostalgic fascination, and re-awakened the obsession to “catch ‘em all.”

For millennials who played the original video game, Pokemon Go has sparked a nostalgic fascination, and re-awakened the obsession to “catch ‘em all.”

But whether you’re new to the game or see it as an old favorite brought back to life, one thing is unmistakable--Pokemon Go’s popularity doesn’t seem to be fading. In fact, it keeps cropping up daily as the topic of controversy.

Concerns surrounding the game include player safety, shedding light on racism and even it’s effect on local businesses

To round-up these concerns, and what you should know about Pokemon Go, Larry speaks to L.A. Times reporter Jessica Roy, who’s been following the popularity of the game.

What do you think of the Pokemon Go? Is it your new favorite past-time or are you aching for the phenomenon to fizzle out?

Guest:

Jessica Roy, reporter for the Los Angeles Times whose coverage includes pop culture; she has been following the popularity of Pokemon Go; Jessica tweets

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