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High profile conflicts in schools again raise the question of whether police should be on campus

Students and campus police enter Gardena High School in California's South Bay.
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images
Students and campus police enter Gardena High School in California's South Bay.

A couple of recent videotaped incidents of physical confrontations at high schools have again raised the question of whether police should be on campus

A couple of recent videotaped incidents of physical confrontations at high schools have again raised the question of whether police should be on campus.

About 43-percent of U.S. high schools have cops on campus. More than 75-percent have armed security staff.

In one prominent incident, a school officer was called to deal with a South Carolina student who refused her teacher's and school administrator's demands she stop texting in class. The officer physically took the girl down in her chair and dragged her several feet. The officer was fired.

The other often watched incident showed a Sacramento student body-slamming a high school principal trying to break up a melee in the cafeteria. The principal gets back up and helps physically restrain the fighters. It was impressive. But should that be part of his job?

What, if any, role should police have on campus? #CopsOnCampus

Guests:

Dean Elder, President of the Anaheim Secondary Teachers Association, the teachers union for Anaheim Union High School District; he’s also taught at Anaheim High School for 31 years

Abre’ Conner, staff attorney with the ACLU of Northern California

Curt Lavarello, executive director of the School Safety Advocacy Council. He also spent 18 years as a school resource officer

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