Member-supported news for Southern California
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Support for KPCC comes from:

‘Road diet’ rage prompts petition for rollback

 A man rides his bike along a controversial bike lane on Prospect Park West on August 17, 2011 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images
A man rides his bike along a controversial bike lane on Prospect Park West on August 17, 2011 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.

Residents of Silver Lake say the real-world experience of a 'road diet' shows the theoretical plan to reduce traffic collisions and increase bike and pedestrian access is not feasible.

Residents of Silver Lake say the real-world experience of a 'road diet' on its busy streets shows the theoretical plan to reduce traffic collisions and increase bike and pedestrian access is not feasible.

Viral videos of packed side streets, loud neighborhood hearings, and a Change.org petition have caught the attention of city officials. However, the L.A. Department of Transportation says this particular 'road diet' - which saw two lanes reduced to one in each direction and added a bike lane - has enjoyed a 50 percent reduction in traffic incidents since its implementation.

Officials say people are upset because during rush hour, commuters avoid the slimmed-down lane by taking side streets. Still, solutions are being discussed.

In order to reverse 'road diets,' there would need be City Council action.

What would change the political will in this policy arena? With LA City moving forward with its Mobility Plan and aspirations for "Vision Zero" fatality reductions, does the focus need to be on keeping side streets inaccessible to commuters? What role are navigation apps playing in the neighborhood congestion?

Guests:

Tim Fremaux, Transportation Engineering Associate, Los Angeles Department of Transportation

Stay Connected