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How to share news of a mutual friend's death: ':-( Bobby's DOA. RIP!'

ECEABAT, TURKEY - APRIL 06: Gravestones commemorate Allied soldiers, mostly Australians, who died during the Gallipoli campaign during World War I at Beach Cemetery near Anzac Cove as stormclouds pass on April 6, 2015 near Eceabat, Turkey. Allied and Turkish representatives, as well as family members of those who served, will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the campaign with ceremonies scheduled for April 24-25. The Gallipoli land campaign, in which a combined Allied force of British, French, Australian, New Zealand and Indian troops sought to occupy the Gallipoli peninsula and the strategic Dardanelles strait, began on April 25, 1915 against forces of the Ottoman Empire. The Allies, unable to advance more than a few kilometers, withdrew after eight months. The campaign cost the Allies approximately 45,000 killed and up to 200,000 wounded, the Ottomans approximately 85,000 killed and 160,000 wounded.    (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Sean Gallup/Getty Images
ECEABAT, TURKEY - APRIL 06: Gravestones commemorate Allied soldiers, mostly Australians, who died during the Gallipoli campaign during World War I at Beach Cemetery near Anzac Cove as stormclouds pass on April 6, 2015 near Eceabat, Turkey. Allied and Turkish representatives, as well as family members of those who served, will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the campaign with ceremonies scheduled for April 24-25. The Gallipoli land campaign, in which a combined Allied force of British, French, Australian, New Zealand and Indian troops sought to occupy the Gallipoli peninsula and the strategic Dardanelles strait, began on April 25, 1915 against forces of the Ottoman Empire. The Allies, unable to advance more than a few kilometers, withdrew after eight months. The campaign cost the Allies approximately 45,000 killed and up to 200,000 wounded, the Ottomans approximately 85,000 killed and 160,000 wounded. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

With an abundance of communication media, what is the etiquette of sharing news of someone's death?

In a hyper-connected world filled with over-sharing, when it comes to the bad news of a friend's death, you are more likely to learn about it through a text message, email or on Facebook than from a phone call or even face-to-face.

With an abundance of communication media, what is the etiquette of sharing news of someone's death?

Advice columnist Amy Alkon says "People tend to sneer at email and text message as lesser forms of communication, but it can be done tactfully and is even preferred by some." Alkon counsels that if you must use text or email to impart the bad news, make sure to offer a phone call, as well. In years past, even a phone call would seem rude and impersonal, "but that is not the pace of the world we live in today," Alkon adds. 

How have you handled sharing the bad news of a friend's death? And has it ever been mishandled by people in your life?

Guest:

Amy Alkon, Author of the science-based book "Good Manners for Bad People who sometimes say F*CK"

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