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White House admits mistake in missing Paris Unity March

(From 5thL) Left-wing party member Robert Hue, leader of the moderate center-left Radical Party of the Left Jean-Michel Baylet, French Socialist Party (PS) first secretary Jean-Christophe Cambadelis (), unidentified, UMP right-wing party member Jean-Francois Cope, Roger Cukierman, President of the CRIF (Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations), Socialist Party member Elisabeth Guigou, Paris' Mayor Anne Hidalgo, former French employers union MEDEF president Laurence Parisot, Jean-Paul Huchon President of the Ile de France region, UMP right-wing party member Valerie Pecresse, the Mayor of Lille and Socialist Party member Martine Aubry, Hassen Chalghoumi, Imam of the northern Paris suburb of Drancy and president of the French Association of Imams, French writer Marek Halter, UMP right-wing party member Eric Woerth, Joel Mergui, president of the Central Jewish Consistory of France, unidentified, unidentified, Pierre Gattaz, head of the French employers' association (MEDEF) and the Rector of Paris' Great Mosque Dalil Boubakeur and Samuel Sandler father and grandfather of three of the victims of Islamist gunman Mohamed Merah (front) take part in a Unity rally Marche Republicaine in Paris on January 11, 2015 in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents.   AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERG        (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images
Unity rally Marche Republicaine in Paris on January 11, 2015 in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists.

In the wake of a mass shooting and dual hostage situations that left 17 innocents dead in France’s capital last week, 3.7 million people marched across that country yesterday as a show of unity, including over a million just in Paris.

In the wake of a mass shooting and dual hostage situations that left 17 innocents dead in France’s capital last week, 3.7 million people marched across that country yesterday as a show of unity, including over a million just in Paris.

Dozens of world leaders joined French President Francois Hollande: German Chancellor Angela Merkel, British Prime Minister David Cameron, Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, and even Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, among others. President Barack Obama and other high-ranking U.S. officials such as Vice-President Joe Biden, Secretary of State John Kerry, and Attorney General Eric Holder (who was in Paris at the time of Sunday’s rally) remained conspicuously absent from the march. Another notable absence was French leader Jean-Marie Le Pen of the prominent far-right Front National (FN) political party, who was not invited to the march organized by President Hollande and former President and current opposition leader Nicolas Sarkozy.

Reactions to the murders of 12 cartoonists at Charlie Hebdo, an on-duty policewoman, and four hostages at a kosher supermarket widely varied with France and across the globe. Millions demonstrated their physically and digitally demonstrated their support through use of the phrase, “Je Suis Charlie,” or “I am Charlie.” Yet a vocal reaction has countered that idea of unity with splintered responses, including “Je Ne Suis Pas Charlie” (“I am not Charlie”), “Je Suis Ahmed” (“I am Ahmed,” phrased after the first name of the Muslim cop who died protecting the Charlie Hebdo building), “Je Suis Juif” (I am Jewish), and more.

At one end, Le Pen has boldly stated “Je Ne Suis Pas Charlie,” while at the other end there are those that believe the attacks were justified. As a new video showing Amedy Coulibaly, the supermarket hostage-taker, talk about his reasons for jihad, a multiplicity of voices and opinions are being heard across the world as people and governments have to deal with the preeminent question: what comes next?

Guests:

Hilary Krieger, deputy White House editor for POLITICO

Julian Zelizer, Professor of History and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the author of multiple books. His latest is “The Fierce Urgency of Now: Lyndon Johnson, Congress, and the Battle for the Great Society” (Penguin Press HC, 2015)

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