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A Wearables Christmas: The latest health and medical devices blurring physical boundaries

Isabelle Olsson, the lead designer of Google Glass, says she is encouraging more women to enter the tech industry — not just as designers, but in all capacities.

For the early adopters on your gift list, forget smartphones and tablets, think biometric shirts and life-trackers.

For the early adopters on your gift list, forget smartphones and tablets, think biometric shirts and life-trackers. As DigitalTrends.com shows in its wearable tech gift guide, the future can be found now with the Hexoskin biometric shirt, for instance. It collects heart rate variability and recovery, breath rate, step count, VO2 max, and more, then connects it to your smartphone via Bluetooth in real time for you or even a remote trainer.

For less serious athletes, the price points and fashion design of wrist-worn wearables are becoming truly accessible for any consumer. Most track your activity level and sleep patterns and synchronize with apps on your phone. These fast-moving tech trends have been recognized by USC's Center for Body Computing. The school is developing ways to translate wearables into better doctor-patient communication and more responsive treatment. Are you ready for wearables? If you use them already, has it benefited you?

Guests: 

Jeremy Kaplan, Editor-in-chief, DigitalTrends.com - news and review site focused on technology; Digital Trends Wearables Holiday Gift Guide;

Dr. Leslie Saxon, Executive Director, University of Southern California Center for Body Computing; Chief, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine; Professor of Medicine and Clinical Scholar, Keck School of Medicine of USC

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